Friday, April 20, 2012

D-day 9: I am Korean-American


Chapter 1 The First Wave of Korea Immigration
Chapter 2 Korean Picture Brides and the Korean Independence Movement in America
Chapter 3 The Korean War and the Second Wave of Korean Immigration
Chapter 4 The Immigration Act of 1965 and a New Group of Korean Americans
Chapter 5 Striving for the American Dream and Korean Small Businesses
Chapter 6 Korean Churches in the United States
Chapter 7 Los Angeles Koreatown: Past and Present
Chapter 8 Korean Americans and Education
Chapter 9 Korean American Ethnic Identity
Chapter 10 Los Angeles Riots 1992 and the Remaking of Korean American Ethnic Identity


**Rightful credit goes to:**

© Korean American History

Hyeyoung Kwon (University of Southern California)
Chanhaeng Lee (State University of New York at Stony Brook)
Korean Education Center in Los Angeles 2009


Chapter 2 Korean Picture Brides and the Korean Independence Movement in America

Background:
Like Asian Indians and Filipinos, Korean immigrants suffered not only from colonialism in their homeland, but also from racist laws in the United States. For example, many Korean immigrants had a difficult time renting homes due to racist laws and were not allowed to own land after the passage of the California Alien Land Law of 1913 which prohibited “aliens ineligible for citizenship from owning land or leasing it for longer than three years.” Koreans were categorized as aliens who were ineligible for naturalized citizenship at the time. In addition, they were denied services at many public recreational places and restaurants. Dr. Lee-wook Chang, former president of the Seoul National University, recalled his experience with racial discrimination as follows:

               I entered a restaurant and sat down in order to have lunch. Although there were not many customers, the waitress did not come to my table. After awhile, a young receptionist came to me and said with a low voice that, “we can‟t serve you lunch, because if we start serving lunch to the Orientals, white Americans will not come here.”

However, what distinguished Korean immigrants from other immigrants was their strong sense of ethnic solidarity which arose from their fight against colonialism in Korea. Most of early Korean immigrants had a great concern about their homeland. According to Bong-Yoon Choy, they always perceived themselves as “temporary sojourners,” and devoted their time and energy to the Korean national independence movement.

Most Korean immigrants left their homeland between 1902 and 1905. Koreans were prohibited from immigrating to the United States after this official emigration period because the Japanese government believed that Korean immigrants would hinder Japanese workers‟ rights on the Hawaiian plantations and participate in anti-Japanese activities in America. Nevertheless, there was a small window of opportunity for Korean women to move to the United States as picture brides.

Because American laws prohibited interracial marriages at the time, Korean bachelors who immigrated to the United States had a very hard time finding wives. This phenomenon led to a significant gender disparity within the Korean immigrant community. About 90 percent of early Korean immigrants in Hawaii were male. It was the practice of picture brides that these bachelors‟ pictures were sent to Korea and shown to single women who were willing to migrate to the United States and become their wives.  For the Japanese government, as Sonia Shinn Sunoo pointed out, the practice was expected to function as an effective means to quell the political passions of Korean immigrants in America. For the Korean picture brides, it would provide an opportunity to escape the traditional gender role imposed by the Confucian society of their homeland.

Korean picture brides (Photo from the Honolulu Advertiser)

The practice began with Japan‟s annexation of Korea in 1910. Because Koreans were considered Japanese nationals after the annexation, the Korean picture brides could use the Gentlemen‟s Agreement of 1907 between the United States and Japan which allowed the wives and children of Japanese immigrants to enter the United States. From 1910 to 1924 when all Asian immigration was prohibited by the passage of the Immigration Act of 1924, more than 900 picture brides immigrated to Hawaii and more than 100 to the mainland to marry Korean immigrants.

Most picture brides were much younger than their husbands. In fact, many Korean immigrant bachelors sent photos that were taken when they first arrived in Hawaii. As a consequence, many men in the photos looked much younger. One of the Korean picture brides, Anna Choi, a fifteen year old at the time of marriage, bitterly recalled the day she met her husband for the first time: “When I first met my fiancé, I could not believe my eyes. His hair was gray and I could not see any resemblance to the picture I had. He was forty-six years old.” Though many picture brides were disappointed by their fiancés, most of them decided to stay in the United States because a refusal to marry them meant going back to Korea. “I cry for eight days,” another picture bride recalled, “and [I] don‟t come out of my room. But I knew that if I don‟t get married, I have to go back to Korea on the next ship. So on the ninth day, I came out and married him. But I don‟t talk to him for three months.”

As the picture brides came to the United States and married Korean men, a new Korean family and community was developing in America. However, most Korean immigrants planned on returning to their native country after making money in the United States. For this reason, when they heard that Korea was annexed by Japan in 1910, they grieved over the loss of their homeland, a motherland to which they hoped to return one day.

Their grief and sorrow helped Korean immigrants to develop a sense of ethnic solidarity. They organized the Korean national independence movement in the United States to protest Japanese colonialism. The patriotic zeal of Korean immigrants enabled them to send their funds to Korea and build political organizations and military schools in the United States. In short, Korean immigrants were “bound to their past by the loss of their home country.” As Elaine Kim puts it, “Korean farmers, waiters, and domestic servants by day became independence workers by night.”

“Protesters against Japan trade” (Photo from the photographic collection of the Korean American Archive, University of Southern California)

Many Korean immigrants focused on education as a means of liberating Korea from Japanese colonialism. As a result, Korean immigrants‟ literacy rate was the highest among Asians living in the United States by 1920. Korean immigrants built language schools to teach Korean history and language to their American-born children. Recognizing that language was the foundation of their national identity, Korean immigrants set up Korean schools in many cities such as Sacramento, San Francisco, Dinuba, Reedley, Delano, Stockton, Manteca, Riverside, Claremont, Upland, and Los Angeles. Many Korean immigrants, including pastors, served as instructors. They used the Bible and Korean newspapers as their textbooks.

The influence of churches at the schools was widespread. By 1918, there were 39 churches that taught Korean history and culture to children of immigrants in Hawaii. In 1920, approximately 800 Koreans attended these language schools in Hawaii, outnumbering their enrollment in public schools. The magnitude of the enrollment not only displayed the organizing power of the Korean churches, but also revealed the depth of Korean American patriotism in their fight against Japanese imperialism.

Furthermore, the Korean churches served also an important resource for Korean immigrants fighting for the independence of their homeland. They were gathering places where many Korean immigrants engaged in political activities. Among these activists were a few significant figures who led the independence movement in the United States. These individuals included Chang Ho Ahn, Syngman Rhee, Yong-man Park, and Jae-pil Suh. Though they all believed that Korean immigrants needed to unite and show loyalty to their homeland, they had different visions; so they used different tactics to achieve their goals. On the one hand, Yong- man Park argued for a militant approach and developed a military academy to train young males to use arms against Japan. Syngman Rhee and Jae-pil Suh focused on diplomacy and propaganda as a way of liberating Korea from Japan, while Chang Ho Ahn emphasized the power of education. In particular, Chang Ho Ahn stressed cultural renewal and the creation of a patriotic leadership among Korean immigrants. Ahn later established an academy and worked as the secretary of labor at the Korean Provisional Government in Shanghai.

Chang Ho Ahn (below center) and the Korean Provisional Government in Shanghai (Photo from www.dosan.org)

Forcibly separated from their homeland, Korean immigrants were often mistaken as the Japanese people. In such case, many Koreans asked to be completely disassociated with the Japanese. On one occasion, a Korean immigrant, Kwang-Son Lee became angry at her history teacher who could not distinguish Korean people from the Japanese, and remarked, “Are you so ignorant you don‟t know what a Korean is? And you a history teacher?”

A significant incident occurred in 1908 that revealed Korean immigrants‟ loyalty to their homeland. Durham Stevens, an American who was employed by the Japanese government, made a public announcement that Koreans were benefiting under Japanese rule and were not fit for self-government. When his speech was published in the San Francisco Chronicle, Korean immigrants were furious and asked Stevens to make a formal apology for justifying Japanese imperialism. When this request was denied, a group of Korean immigrants confronted Stevens. It was at the time that one of the protesters, In-hwan Chang, took out a gun and assassinated Stevens. During his trial, Chang denounced Stevens as “a traitor to Korea” and said, “To die for having shot a traitor is glory, because I did it for my people.” Many Korean immigrants rallied for Chang and donated money for his defense. Though their efforts to release Chang failed and he was sentenced to serve 25 years at San Quentin State Prison, Chang remained a hero within Korean immigrant communities.

References
1. Chan, Sucheng (1991). Asian Americans: An Interpretive History. Boston: Twayne Publishers.
2. Chang, Edward T. (1995). Following the Footsteps of Korean Americans. Cerritos, CA: Pacific Institute for Peacemaking.
3. Jo, Moon H. (1999). Korean Immigrants and the Challenge of Adjustment. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press.
4. Kim, Lili M. (2003). “Redefining the Boundaries of Traditional Gender Roles: Korean Picture Brides, Pioneer Korean Immigrant Women, and Their Benevolent Nationalism in Hawaii.” In Shirley Hune and Gail M. Nomura (Eds.), Asian/Pacific Islander American Women: A Historical Anthology. NY: New York University Press.
5. Patterson, Wayne (2000). The Ilse: First-Generation Korean Immigrants in Hawaii, 1903-1973. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press and Center for Korean Studies.
6. Sunoo, Sonia Shinn (2002). Korean Picture Brides, 1903-1920: A Collection of Oral Histories. Philadelphia: Xlibris.
7. Takaki, Ronald (1998). Strangers from a Different Shore. Boston: Little, Brown and Company.

Click READ MORE for korean translation


© 미주 한인 역사
번역: 이찬행 (뉴욕주립대학교)
로스앤젤레스 한국교육원 2009

2장 사진 신부와 한인 동포들의 독립운동

배경:
인도계 및 필리핀계 미국인들과 마찬가지로 미주 한인들은 고국에서의 식민주의 뿐만 아니라 미국의 인종주의적 법으로 인해 수많은 고통을 겪었다. 예를 들어 한인 이민자들은 인종주의적인 법 때문에 집을 렌트하는 데도 어려움이 있었으며 당시에는 귀화 자격이 없는 외국인으로 분류되고 있었기에 미국 시민으로 귀화할 수 없는 자는 토지를 소유하거나 3년 이상 리스하는 것을 금지하는 1913년 캘리포니아 외국인 토지법이 통과된 이후에는 토지를 가질 수도 없었다. 게다가 한인들은 공공 여가 시설과 레스토랑 서비스도 누릴 수 없었다. 훗날 서울대학교 총장을 역임한 장리욱 박사는 자신이 당한 인종차별 경험을 다음과 같이 회상한다.

             점심을 먹기 위해 레스토랑에 들어가 앉았죠. 그 레스토랑 안에는 손님도 그다지 많지 않았어요. 그런데 종업원이 제가 앉은 테이블에 오질 않더군요. 한참이 지난 후에 젊은 종업원 한 명이 제게 오더니 낮은 목소리로 이렇게 말하더군요. “우리는 당신에게 서비스를 제공할 수 없습니다. 우리가 동양인들에게 점심 식사를 서비스하기 시작하면 백인들이 이곳을 찾지 않을 것이기 때문이죠.”

그렇지만 한인들은 강한 민족 단결의식을 지니고 있었는데 이러한 점은 고국에서의 반()식민주의 투쟁으로부터 연원한 것임과 동시에 한인 이민자들을 다른 이민자들로부터 구별시켜주는 것이기도 했다. 대부분의 초기 한인 이민자들은 고국에 대해 지대한 관심을 지니고 있었다. 최봉윤의 설명에 의하면 한인 이민자들은 항상 스스로를 일시적인 체류객으로 생각했으며 많은 시간과 열정을 고국의 독립운동에 헌신했다.

대부분의 한인들은 1902년과 1905년 사이에 이민을 떠났다. 이러한 공식적인 이민기 이후 한인들의 미국 이민은 금지당하게 된다. 일본 정부는 한인 이민자들이 하와이 플랜테이션에 있던 자국 노동자들의 권리에 방해가 될 것이라고 생각했으며 나아가 한인들이 미국에서 반일 활동에 참여할 것이라고 믿었기 때문이다. 그럼에도 불구하고 일부 한인 여성들은 사진 신부 자격으로 미국에 입국할 수 있었다.

당시 미국법은 인종간 결혼을 금지했으며 그 결과 미국으로 이주한 한인 총각들은 배우자를 찾는 데 어려움이 많았다. 이는 결국 하와이 초기 한인 이민자들의 90퍼센트는 남성이라는 극심한 성비 파괴로 귀결되었다. 사진 신부는 미국에 오고자 하는 한국의 여성들에게 한인 이민 남성들의 사진을 보여주고 미국으로 건너와 사진 속의 남자와 결혼하도록 하는 관행으로부터 비롯되었다. 소냐 신 선우에 따르면 일본 정부측은 이러한 사진 신부 관행을 한인 이민자들의 정치적 열정을 억누를 수 있는 효과적인 수단으로 간주했다. 사진 신부 입장에서 보자면 이 관행은 전통적인 유교 사회가 부과하던 젠더 역할에서 벗어날 수 있는 기회를 제공하였다.

Korean picture brides (Photo from the Honolulu Advertiser)

사진 신부의 미국 이민은 1910년 한일합방과 함께 시작되었다. 한일합방 이후 한국인들은 일본의 식민지 국민으로 간주되었는데 사진 신부들은 이러한 식민지 국민이라는 자격으로 1907년에 미국과 일본이 체결한 신사협정의 조항, 즉 일본 이민자의 아내와 자녀들에게 미국 이민을 허락한다는 조항을 이용하여 미국에 이민을 올 수 있었다. 그 결과 1910년부터 모든 아시안들의 미국 이민이 금지되었던 1924년까지 9백여 명 이상의 사진 신부들이 하와이에 왔으며 1백여 명 이상은 미국 본토로 가서 한인 이민 남성들과 결혼하였다.

대부분의 사진 신부들은 남편보다 훨씬 어렸다. 사실상 많은 수의 한인 이민 남성들은 자신들이 하와이에 처음 도착했을 때 찍은 사진을 한국에 보냈다. 따라서 사진 속의 인물은 훨씬 젊어 보이기 마련이었다. 사진 신부였던 애나 최씨는 결혼할 당시 15세였다. 그녀는 남편을 처음 만났을 때를 이렇게 회상하며 씁쓸해했다. “약혼자를 처음 만났을 때 저는 제 눈을 의심했어요...그이는 흰머리가 많았고 사진 속의 남자와 조금도 닮지 않았더라구요. 그이는 당시 마흔 여섯살이었어요.” 많은 수의 사진 신부들이 남편에게 실망했지만 대부분의 경우에는 미국에 남기로 결심했다. 왜냐하면 비록 나이가 든 신랑일지라도 그들과의 결혼을 거절한다는 것은 본국으로 돌아가야만 함을 의미했기 때문이었다. 사진 신부였던 다른 한 여인은 이렇게 말한다. “저는 팔일 동안 울었어요. 방에서 나오지도 않았죠. 그러다가 저는 만약 결혼을 하지 않는다면 배를 타고 한국으로 돌아가야 한다는 것을 깨달았죠. 그래서 아홉 번째 되던 날 방에서 나와 결국 그이와 결혼했어요. 하지만 전 석 달 동안 그이와 말도 안 했답니다.”

사진 신부들이 미국으로 와서 한인 남성들과 결혼하면서 비로소 미국에 한인 커뮤니티가 형성되기 시작했다. 하지만 대부분의 한인 이민자들은 미국에서 돈을 번 뒤 고국으로 돌아갈 계획을 하였다. 그렇기 때문에 1910년 한국이 일본에 합병됐다는 소식을 접했을 때 이들 한인 이민자들은 언젠가 돌아가기만을 손꼽아 기다렸던 고국이 없어진 사실을 매우 슬퍼했다.

그럼에도 불구하고 슬픔과 비애는 한인들이 민족 단결의식을 키우도록 도왔다. 한인들은 미국에서 일본의 식민주의에 저항하는 독립운동에 참여했다. 그들은 조국을 사랑하는 마음에서 애국 자금을 마련해 고국에 보냈으며 미국에 정치 조직과 군사 학교를 건설하기도 했다. 요컨대 한인 이민자들은 고국이 없어지면서 과거에 묶이고 말았다.” 일레인 김이 말하듯이 한인 이민자들은 낮에는 농부, 웨이터, 하인으로 일했지만 밤에는 모두 독립 운동가들이 되었다.”

“Protesters against Japan trade” (Photo from the photographic collection of the Korean American Archive, University of Southern California)

상당수의 한인들은 일제 식민주의로부터 독립을 쟁취하기 위해 교육에 매달리기도 했다. 그 결과 한인 이민자들의 문맹율은 1920년까지 미국 내 아시안들 가운데 가장 낮았다. 한인들은 또한 미국에서 태어난 자녀들에게 한국의 역사와 언어를 가르치기 위해 학교를 세우기도 했다. 언어가 민족 정체성의 근간임을 인식한 한인들은 새크라멘토, 샌프란시스코, 디누바, 리들리, 델라노, 스탁턴, 맨테카, 리버사이드, 클레어몬트, 업랜드, 로스앤젤레스 등의 지역에 한글 학교를 설립했다. 목사를 비롯해 많은 수의 한인 이민자들이 교사로
봉사했으며 이들은 성경과 한글 신문을 교재로 사용했다

학교에서 교회의 영향력은 널리 퍼졌다. 1918년까지 하와이에서는 39개의 교회가 이민자 자녀들에게 한국의 역사와 문화를 가르쳤다. 1920년에는 대략 8백여 명의 한인들이 한글 학교에 다녔으며 이 수치는 하와이 공립학교에 등록한 한인들의 숫자보다 많은 것이었다. 한글 학교에 대한 한인들의 열의는 한인 교회들이 갖고 있는 조직력 뿐만 아니라 일본 제국주의에 맞서는 한인들의 커다란 애국심을 잘 보여주었다. 교회는 한인 이민자들의 독립운동을 위한 중요한 공간이기도 했다

교회는 한인 이민자들이 모여 정치 활동을 벌이는 회합 장소였다. 당시 활동가들 가운데는 안창호, 이승만, 박용만, 서재필과 같이 미국에서의 독립운동을 이끌었던 중요 인물들도 포함된다. 이들은 모두 한인 이민자들이 단결하여 고국에 대한 충성을 보일 필요가 있다고 믿었으나 서로 상이한 전망을 지니고 있었으며 그 결과 자신들의 목적을 성취하기 위한 전술도 각각 달랐다. 박용만은 군사적 접근을 주장했으며 일본에 맞서 젊은이들을 무장시키기 위해 군사 학교을 추진했다. 이승만과 서재필은 독립을 쟁취하기 위한 방도로 외교와 홍보를 강조했지만 안창호는 교육의 힘에 주목했다. 특히 안창호는 한인 이민자들의 문화적 갱생과 애국적 리더십의 형성에 힘을 쏟았다. 훗날 안창호는 학교를 설립했으며 상해 임시정부에서 노동국 총판을 맡기도 했다.

Chang Ho Ahn (below center) and the Korean Provisional Government in Shanghai (Photo from www.dosan.org)

강제로 고국과 단절된 한인 이민자들은 종종 일본인으로 오해를 받기도 했는데 이럴 때마다 한인들은 일본인들과 자신들을 분명히 구별해줄 것을 요구했다. 예를 들어 이광손이라는 한인은 일본인과 한인을 구별하지 못하는 그녀의 역사 교사에게 화를 내며 이렇게 말했다. “어떻게 선생님은 한국인이 누구인지도 모르시죠? 역사 선생님 맞나요?”

1908년에 일어난 한 사건은 한인들이 고국에 대해 지니고 있는 애국심을 잘 보여준다. 일본 정부가 고용한 미국인 스티븐스는 일본의 지배로 인해 식민지 한국인들이 혜택을 입고 있으며 한국인들은 자치를 하기에 적합하지 않다는 내용의 발언을 공개적으로 한 바 있다. 스티븐스의 발언이 San Francisco Chronicle 신문에 기사화되자 이에 분노한 한인 이민자들은 스티븐스에게 일본 제국주의를 정당화한 것에 대한 공식적인 사과를 요청했다. 이러한 요구가 거절되자 한인들은 스티븐스에게 항의했는데 당시 이들 가운데 한 명이었던 장인환은 권총을 꺼내 그를 사살했다. 이를 이유로 장인환은 결국 체포되었으나 법정에서 그는 스티븐스를 한국을 배반한 자로 규탄하며 다음과 같이 말했다. “배반자를 죽였다는 이유로 죽는다는 것은 영광이다. 나는 우리 민족을 위해 이 일을 했을 뿐이다.” 많은 수의 한인들이 장인환의 석방을 위해 모여들었고 기부금을 내기도 했다. 비록 장인환을 구하려는 한인들의 노력은 실패하여 그는 샌 퀸틴 주립 형무소에 25년 동안 수감된다는 평결을 받았지만 장인환은 한인 이민 커뮤니티에 영웅으로 남게 됐다.

참고문헌
1. Chan, Sucheng (1991). Asian Americans: An Interpretive History. Boston: Twayne Publishers.
2. Chang, Edward T. (1995). Following the Footsteps of Korean Americans. Cerritos, CA: Pacific Institute for Peacemaking.
3. Jo, Moon H. (1999). Korean Immigrants and the Challenge of Adjustment. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press.
4. Kim, Lili M. (2003). “Redefining the Boundaries of Traditional Gender Roles: Korean Picture Brides, Pioneer Korean Immigrant Women, and Their Benevolent Nationalism in Hawaii.” In Shirley Hune and Gail M. Nomura (Eds.), Asian/Pacific Islander American Women: A Historical Anthology. NY: New York University Press.
5. Patterson, Wayne (2000). The Ilse: First-Generation Korean Immigrants in Hawaii, 1903-1973. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press and Center for Korean Studies.
6. Sunoo, Sonia Shinn (2002). Korean Picture Brides, 1903-1920: A Collection of Oral Histories. Philadelphia: Xlibris.
7. Takaki, Ronald (1998). Strangers from a Different Shore. Boston: Little, Brown and Company.

✎ From the ☾ moon that shines bright as a shooting star ☆

2 comments:

  1. hi, nice meet you
    your post is very good
    but font is very difficult to read
    ^-^

    ReplyDelete
  2. sorry, i'll changed them right now~
    thanks for taking an interest =D

    ReplyDelete