Friday, April 27, 2012

D-day 2: I am Korean-American


Chapter 1 The First Wave of Korea Immigration
Chapter 2 Korean Picture Brides and the Korean Independence Movement in America
Chapter 3 The Korean War and the Second Wave of Korean Immigration
Chapter 4 The Immigration Act of 1965 and a New Group of Korean Americans
Chapter 5 Striving for the American Dream and Korean Small Businesses
Chapter 6 Korean Churches in the United States
Chapter 7 Los Angeles Koreatown: Past and Present
Chapter 8 Korean Americans and Education
Chapter 9 Korean American Ethnic Identity
Chapter 10 Los Angeles Riots 1992 and the Remaking of Korean American Ethnic Identity


**Rightful credit goes to:**
© Korean American History
Hyeyoung Kwon (University of Southern California)
Chanhaeng Lee (State University of New York at Stony Brook)
Korean Education Center in Los Angeles 2009

Chapter 9 Korean American Ethnic Identity

Background:
Many Korean American children experience confusion about their ethnic identity. They suffer from the perplexing experience of growing up in America without being a full part of it. This chapter examines the historical and current contexts that prevent Korean Americans from being completely accepted into America. It also explores why it is difficult for them to embrace their ethnic culture.

While Asian immigrants have been placed within the workplace of the United States, as Lisa Lowe maintained, they have been also considered “unintelligible” and “foreign” to the national polity. In other words, Asian immigrants were required as a cheap labor force from the mid-nineteenth century, and yet they were marked as racially and culturally unassimilable “others” in the United States: Asians were “required but not welcomed.”

In the realm of political and popular culture, Asian immigrants were considered an “inferior race.” They were associated with stereotypical images such as the “yellow peril” and the “perpetual foreigner.” The yellow peril stereotype was created during the mid-late nineteenth century with the immigration of Chinese workers to the United States. According to David Palumbo-Liu, the Chinese were associated with an innumerable, infinite, and unsanitary “mass” in the American imagination. In this context, Chinatowns were characterized in terms of “excess” of population and disease. They were perceived as a medical menace to Americans.

The image of the yellow peril later applied to the Japanese. If the yellow peril stereotyped the Chinese as a fearful mass and medical threat, then the Japanese were imagined as a political and military threat to the United States. In particular, the rise of Japan as a major world power created anxiety among American people around the time of World War II. As a result of such fear, American people viewed Japanese Americans in the United States as a potential enemy, and eventually incarcerated many of them in concentration camps after the attack on Pearl Harbor.

The yellow peril was a common theme in comic books, fiction, newspapers, and even scholarly works. This stereotype negatively affected the lives of all Asian Americans. In 1910, early Korean immigrants also suffered from the yellow peril stereotype in a racial riot, known as the “Steward Incident,” in Upland, California where White farmers and workers violently attacked and threatened to kill Korean orange-pickers of the orchard owned by Mary E. Steward to dispel them from the Upland area.

“The yellow terror in all his glory,” 1899 (Photo from Contexts: Understanding People in Their Social Worlds)

Evacuees of Japanese ancestry in Lone Pine, California, 1942 (Photo from Harry S. Truman Library and Museum Photograph Database)

Another popular stereotypical image associated with Asian Americans was the perpetual foreigner. Throughout American history, Asian Americans were always treated as foreigners who were unable to fully assimilate into the American mainstream society. Many believed that Asian Americans were inherently outsiders within the American political and social spheres, regardless of their citizenship or length of residence in the United States. As Thomas P. Kim argued, Asian Americans are still being ostracized as racialized foreigners by political elites, particularly when they are represented as a political hurdle to building a majority party coalition.

These stereotypical images enabled the passage of many racist laws and prevented many early Korean immigrants from enjoying the same privileges and legal rights that Whites benefited from. Although many discriminatory legal practices have been eliminated today, many American people still perceive Asian Americans as foreigners. It has negative consequences on Korean immigrants and their children in their daily interactions with others.

American-born Koreans often hear the question, “Where are you from?” or receive compliments when they speak English without an accent. However, underlying these simple remarks or compliments is an implied message that being American means being White. In this sense, a Korean person with yellow skin and more narrowly-shaped eyes cannot be seen as a full American. Korean Americans may try to speak English without an accent, learn mainstream cultural values, and even marry a White person, but as long as they retain their ethnic features, they will be seen as foreigners. In the worst case, Korean Americans have been victims of hate crimes due to racial stereotypes associated with their physical characteristics.

As a result of these stereotypes, many Korean American children, especially those who are born in the United States, suffer from identity crisis. In extreme cases, some American-born Koreans buy into negative stereotypes and feel ashamed of who they are. Some try to change their physical appearance by changing their hair color or by having plastic surgery to remove their ethnic features, but they often end up being neither. This painful experience is vividly described in “A Letter to My Sister,” written by a Korean American female to her sister who committed suicide.

I remember the first time, when I found you after you had cut your wrists with a kitchen knife, and later when our father, using his deft surgical skills, sewed you back up in his office...your obsession with plastic surgery exposed the myth of the whole beauty industry, which portrays plastic surgery as a beautifying, renewing experience... it began with your eyes and nose, and you continued to go back for more. You tried to box yourself into a preconditioned, Euro- American ideal and literally excised the parts that would not fit...We became pathetic victims of whiteness. We permed our hair and could afford to buy trendy clothes. Money, at least, gave us some material status. But we knew we could never become “popular” in other words, accepted. It had something to do with our “almond-shaped” eyes, but we never called it racism. You once asked, “What‟s wrong with trying to be white?”...I feel disgusted and angry and so, so sorry when I think of how I participated in the self-hatred that helped to kill you.

For American-born Korean children growing up in immigrant households, it is hard to communicate their frustration and confusion with their parents. Many immigrant parents came to the United States to find better opportunities for their children. They believed that it was language barriers and cultural differences that prevented them from obtaining professional careers in the mainstream society. As a result of their negative experiences, they often push their children to study hard and be accepted in the society.

However, Korean children often complain that their parents‟ high expectations add stress to their lives. What creates even more confusion among these children is that the same parents who push their children to excel in the American mainstream society also tell their children to retain their Korean culture and language. When there is miscommunication and misunderstanding, Korean children of immigrants face profound uncertainty about their identities.

The loss of ethnic heritage and language can have profound consequences on Asian American children and their families, especially when losing their primary language means the inability to speak with their immigrant parents. With the substantial decrease in public support for bilingual education and current shifts to resolve the immigrant language problem through early education policies and “English Only” preschools, the primary language retention rate for Asian children of immigrants is expected to decline much more rapidly. Today, as many as three-quarters of second generation Asian American children speak only English at home despite the large number of immigrant parents who cannot speak English fluently.

Communication is the primary link for all parent-child relationships. When Asian Americans lose their parents‟ language in the process of acquiring English, it is impossible for many monolingual immigrant parents to convey their advice and effectively teach their children about social and cultural responsibility.

There should be an attempt to provide positive experiences of learning about ethnic language and culture for Korean American children. For Asian Americans stereotyped as foreigners or outsiders, the pressure to prove their inclusion into the mainstream society and display accepted American characteristics can hinder the development of their ethnic identity.

References
1. Choy, Bong-Youn (1979). Koreans in America. Chicago: Nelson-Hall. 2. Kim, Thomas P. (2007). The Racial Logic of Politics: Asian Americans and Party
Competition. Philadelphia: Temple University Press. 3. Lowe, Lisa (1996). Immigrant Acts: On Asian American Cultural Politics. Durham:
Duke University Press. 4. Osajima, Keith (1988). “Asian Americans as the Model Minority: An Analysis of the
Popular Press Image in the 1960s and 1980s.” In Gary. Y. Okihiro, John M. Liu, Arthur A. Hansen, Shirley Hune (Eds.), Reflections on Shattered Windows: Promises and Prospects for Asian American Studies. Pullman, Washington: Washington State University Press.
5. Palumbo-Liu, David (1999). Asian/American: Historical Crossings of a Racial Frontier. Stanford: Stanford University Press.
6. Shah, Nayan (2001). Contagious Divides: Epidemics and Race in San Francisco’s Chinatown. Berkeley: University of California Press.
7. Taylor, Charles, and Lee, Ju Yung (1994). “Not in Vogue: Portrayals of Asian Americans in Magazine Advertising.” Journal of Public Policy and Marketing, 13(2), 239-245.
8. Turnmeyer, Maria Mami (2006). “Representations of Asian Americans in Advertising: Constructing Images of Asian Americans.” In Edith Wen-Chu Chen and Glenn Omatsu (Eds.), Teaching about Asian Pacific Americans. Lanham, MD: Roman and Littlefield.
9. Wong-Fillmore, L. (1991). “When Learning a Second Language Means Losing the First.” Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 6: 323-346.



Click READ MORE for Korean translation


© 미주 한인 역사
번역: 이찬행 (뉴욕주립대학교)
로스앤젤레스 한국교육원 2009



9장 미주 한인의 정체성

배경:
많은 수의 한인 학생들은 자신들의 에스닉 정체성에 대해 혼란스러워 한다. 그들은 미국의 온전한 일부분이 아닌 상태로 성장하게 되고 이 과정에서 여러 가지 당혹스러운 경험을 하게 된다. 이번 장은 한인들이 미국 사회에 완벽하게 받아들여지는 것을 가로막는 역사적 현실적 배경을 검토한다. 그리고 왜 한인들이 자신들의 에스닉 문화를 충분히 포용하지 못하는지도 알아보도록 한다.

리자 로우의 주장에 의하면 아시안 이민자들은 그동안 미국의 수많은 일터에서 노동을 해왔지만 그들은 동시에 지적이지 못한존재로 그리고 외국인으로 간주되었다. 달리 말하자면 19세기 중반 이래 미국은 값싼 노동력을 구하기 위해 아시안 이민자들을 필요로 했지만 아시안 이민자들은 미국에 인종적으로 문화적으로 동화될 수 없는 타자로 규정되었다. 한마디로 아시안들은 필요하지만 환영받지 못한사람들이었다.

미국의 정치 문화와 대중 문화의 영역에서 아시안 이민자들은 열등한 인종으로 간주되었다. 그들은 황화(黃禍, yellow peril)” 그리고 영원한 외국인과 같은 고정 관념과 연루되었다. 황화라는 고정 관념은 19세기 중후반 중국인 노동자들이 미국에 이민을 오면서 만들어졌다. 데이비드 팔룸보-리우에 따르면 미국인들의 상상 속에서 중국인들은 무수한, 헤아릴 수 없는, 그리고 청결하지 못한 다수라는 이미지와 연관되었다. 이러한 맥락에서 차이나타운은 인구 및 질병의 과잉이라는 측면으로 특징화되었으며 미국인들에게 하나의 의학적인 위협으로 여겨졌다.

황화라는 이미지는 훗날 일본인에게도 적용되었다. 중국인에 대한 황화 고정 관념이 다수와 의학적인 위협에 대한 두려움을 불러일으켰다면 일본인들은 미국에 대한 정치적 군사적 위협으로 상상되었다. 특히 일본이 세계 강국으로 부상하자 제2차 세계대전 무렵 많은 미국인들은 이에 대해 점점 불안해했다. 이러한 두려움의 결과 미국인들은 일본계 미국인들을 잠재적인 적으로 간주하게 되었으며 결국 진주만 공격이 발생하자 일본계 미국인들을 강제 수용소에 가두고 말았다.

황화라는 고정 관념은 만화, 소설, 신문 등에 자주 등장하는 주제였으며 심지어 학술적인 연구에서도 빈번하게 사용되었다. 이 고정 관념은 모든 아시안 아메리칸의 삶에 부정적인 영향을 끼쳤다. 초기 한인 이민자들도 1910스튜어드 사건이라는 인종 폭동이 발생했을 때 이러한 고정 관념으로부터 피해를 입었다. 당시 한인들은 매리 E. 스튜어드가 소유한 캘리포니아 업 랜드 지역의 과수원에서 오렌지를 따는 일꾼으로 일하고 있었는데 백인 농장주들과 일꾼들은 한인들을 폭력적으로 공격하고 살해 협박까지 서슴지 않았다.

“The yellow terror in all his glory,” 1899 (Photo from Contexts: Understanding People in Their Social Worlds)

Evacuees of Japanese ancestry in Lone Pine, California, 1942 (Photo from Harry S. Truman Library and Museum Photograph Database)

아시안 아메리칸에 대한 또 하나의 고정 관념은 영원한 외국인이라는 이미지였다. 미국의 역사를 통틀어 볼 때 아시안 아메리칸은 미국의 주류 사회에 동화될 수 없는 외국인으로 항상 간주되었다. 많은 사람들은 아시안 아메리칸이 미국 시민권자이건 아니건 그리고 그들의 미국 체류 기간과 상관없이 이들을 미국 정치 및 사회 영역의 이방인이라고 믿었다. 토마스 W. 김의 분석에 의하면, 아시안 아메리칸은 미국의 정당들이 주요한 정치적 연대를 형성하는 데 있어 장애로 표상되는 순간에는 오늘날에도 정치적 엘리트들에 의해 인종화된 외국인으로 내몰리고 있는 실정이다. 이러한 고정 관념은 수많은 인종주의적 법들이 제정되도록 만들었으며 초기 한인 이민자들이 백인들이 누렸던 특권과 법적인 권리를 향유할 수 없도록 가로막았다. 비록 오늘날에는 차별적인 법의 상당수가 철폐되었지만 아직까지도 많은 사람들은 아시안 아메리칸을 외국인으로 생각하고 있다. 이러한 고정 관념은 한인 이민자들과 자녀들의 일상 생활에 부정적인 결과를 초래한다.

미국에서 태어난 한인들이 액센트가 없는 영어를 말할 때 이들은 종종 너 어디에서 왔니?라는 질문 내지는 칭찬을 받곤 한다. 하지만 이와 같은 칭찬의 기저에는 미국인이라는 것은 백인을 의미한다는 암묵적인 메세지가 놓여 있다. 이런 의미에서 노란 피부와 좁은 눈을 지닌 한인은 완전한 미국인으로 간주될 수 없다. 물론 한인이 액센트 없는 영어를 사용할 수도 있으며 주류 사회의 문화적 가치를 배우고 심지어 백인과 결혼할 수도 있다. 하지만 한인의 에스닉 특징들이 남아있는 한 그들은 영구적인 외국인으로 여겨질 것이다. 최악의 경우 한인은 자신들의 육체적인 특징들과 연관된 인종적 고정 관념 때문에 혐오 범죄의 희생이 되어 왔다.

이와 같은 고정 관념의 결과 한인 아이들, 특히 미국에서 태어난 한인 아이들은 정체성의 위기에 직면하게 된다. 극단적인 경우 미국에서 출생한 한인 아이들은 자신들에 대한 부정적인 고정 관념을 받아들여 스스로에 대해 수치심을 가질 수도 있다. 몇몇 한인 아이들은 자신들의 에스닉 특징들을 없애기 위해 머리 색깔을 바꾸거나 성형 수술을 함으로써 외모를 변경하기도 하지만 결국에는 모두 실패로 끝나고 만다. 어느 한 한인 여성이 자살을 시도한 자신의 자매에게 보낸 “A Letter to My Sister”는 이러한 고통스러운 경험을 생생하게 담고 있다.

             나는 네가 부엌칼로 너의 손목을 그었을 때와 아빠가 오피스에서 네 손목의 상처를 능숙한 수술 솜씨로 봉합하셨던 때를 기억해...성형 수술에 대한 너의 집착은 성형 수술을 아름다워지고 새롭게 태어나는 경험으로 묘사하는 미용 산업의 신화를 너무 잘 보여줬어. 너는 먼저 눈과 코의 성형을 시작했지. 그리고 넌 계속해서 더 많은 부분에 대해 성형 수술을 시도했어. 넌 미리 만들어진 이상적인 모습에, 유럽계 미국인들의 이상적인 모습에 스스로를 맞추려고 했으며 여기에 맞지 않는 부분을 사실상 잘라내려고 했지...우리는 백인성(whiteness)의 불쌍한 피해자가 됐어. 우리는 파머를 하고 유행하는 옷을 사 입을 수도 있었지. 돈은 최소한 우리에게 물질적인 신분을 안겨줬어. 그렇지만 우리는 결코 인기가 있을수도 없고, 달리 말하자면, 받아들여질 수 없다는 것을 알게 됐지. 그건 우리의 아몬드처럼 생긴눈과 관계가 있었지만 우린 결코 그것을 인종주의라고 부르진 않았어. 언젠가 넌 백인처럼 되려고 하는 게 무슨 잘못이야?라고 물었지...난 역겹고 화가 나. 그리고 너를 죽게 만들었던 자기 혐오에 나의 책임도 있다는 걸 생각하면 너무 미안해.

미국에서 태어나 이민자 가정에서 자란 한인 아이들이 자신들이 느끼는 좌절감과 혼란을 부모에게 이야기하기란 결코 쉬운 일이 아니다. 이민자 부모들은 자녀들에게 보다 좋은 기회를 주기 위해 미국에 왔다. 그들은 미국의 주류 사회에서 전문직을 가질 수 없는 이유가 언어 장벽과 문화적 차이 때문이라고 믿었다. 이러한 부정적인 경험으로 말미암아 부모들은 종종 자녀들에게 공부를 열심히 해서 주류 사회에 속해야 한다고 압력을 가했다.

하지만 한인 아이들은 부모들의 높은 기대치가 자신들의 인생에 스트레스를 더해주고 있다고 불만을 표한다. 더욱 혼란을 야기하는 것은 미국의 주류 사회에서 훌륭하게 성공해야 한다고 재촉하는 부모들이 자녀들에게 한국의 문화와 언어를 간직하라고 말한다는 사실이다. 충분한 소통이 없고 오해가 있을 때 한인 이민자 자녀들은 자신들의 정체성에 대해 심각한 불확실성에 직면하게 된다.

에스닉 유산과 언어의 상실은 아시안 아메리칸 아이들과 가족에 심각한 결과를 초래할 40
수 있다. 이는 특히 언어 문제로 인해 자녀들이 이민자 부모들과 소통할 수 없을 때 잘 드러난다. 이중 언어 교육에 대한 공적인 지원이 크게 줄어들고 이민자 언어 문제를 조기 교육 정책과 취학 전 학교(preschool)에서 영어만 사용하도록 함으로써 해결하고자 하는 현재의 상황에 비추어볼 때 아시안계 이민자 자녀들이 부모의 언어를 사용하는 비율은 급속도로 감소할 것이다. 오늘날 상당수의 이민자 부모들이 영어를 유창하게 말하지 못함에도 불구하고 아시안 아메리칸 2세 아이들의 3/4이 집에서 영어만 사용하고 있는 실정이다.

언어 소통은 모든 부모-자녀 관계에 있어 일차적인 연결 고리이다. 아이들이 영어를 습득하는 과정에서 부모가 사용하는 언어를 잃게 되면 하나의 언어만을 사용하는 많은 수의 부모들은 자녀들에게 조언을 할 수도 없고 사회적 문화적 책임감에 대해 효과적인 가르침을 전달하는 것도 불가능해진다.

한인 학생들에게 한글과 에스닉 문화를 배우는 긍정적인 경험을 제공할 필요가 있다. 외국인 혹은 이방인이라는 고정 관념으로 묘사되는 아시안 아메리칸에게 미국적인 특징을 보이고 미국 사회에 포함되었음을 증명하라고 압력을 가하는 것은 그들의 에스닉 정체성 발달을 가로막을 수 있다.

참고문헌
1. Choy, Bong-Youn (1979). Koreans in America. Chicago: Nelson-Hall. 2. Kim, Thomas P. (2007). The Racial Logic of Politics: Asian Americans and Party
Competition. Philadelphia: Temple University Press. 3. Lowe, Lisa (1996). Immigrant Acts: On Asian American Cultural Politics. Durham:
Duke University Press. 4. Osajima, Keith (1988). “Asian Americans as the Model Minority: An Analysis of the
Popular Press Image in the 1960s and 1980s.” In Gary. Y. Okihiro, John M. Liu, Arthur A. Hansen, Shirley Hune (Eds.), Reflections on Shattered Windows: Promises and Prospects for Asian American Studies. Pullman, Washington: Washington State University Press.
5. Palumbo-Liu, David (1999). Asian/American: Historical Crossings of a Racial Frontier. Stanford: Stanford University Press.
6. Shah, Nayan (2001). Contagious Divides: Epidemics and Race in San Francisco’s Chinatown. Berkeley: University of California Press.
7. Taylor, Charles, and Lee, Ju Yung (1994). “Not in Vogue: Portrayals of Asian Americans in Magazine Advertising.” Journal of Public Policy and Marketing, 13(2), 239-245.
8. Turnmeyer, Maria Mami (2006). “Representations of Asian Americans in Advertising: Constructing Images of Asian Americans.” In Edith Wen-Chu Chen and Glenn Omatsu (Eds.), Teaching about Asian Pacific Americans. Lanham, MD: Roman and Littlefield.
9. Wong-Fillmore, L. (1991). “When Learning a Second Language Means Losing the First.” Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 6: 323-346.

From the moon that shines bright as a shooting star





No comments:

Post a Comment