Monday, April 23, 2012

D-Day 6: I am Korean-American


Chapter 1 The First Wave of Korea Immigration
Chapter 2 Korean Picture Brides and the Korean Independence Movement in America
Chapter 3 The Korean War and the Second Wave of Korean Immigration
Chapter 4 The Immigration Act of 1965 and a New Group of Korean Americans
Chapter 5 Striving for the American Dream and Korean Small Businesses
Chapter 6 Korean Churches in the United States
Chapter 7 Los Angeles Koreatown: Past and Present
Chapter 8 Korean Americans and Education
Chapter 9 Korean American Ethnic Identity
Chapter 10 Los Angeles Riots 1992 and the Remaking of Korean American Ethnic Identity



**Rightful credit goes to:**

© Korean American History

Hyeyoung Kwon (University of Southern California)
Chanhaeng Lee (State University of New York at Stony Brook)
Korean Education Center in Los Angeles 2009




Chapter 5 Striving for the American Dream and Korean Small Businesses

Background:


Korean small businesses in Los Angeles Koreatown, 1997 (Photo from the Los Angeles Public Library Photo Collection)

Korean immigrants have changed the landscape of many cities by opening small businesses. In American cities such as Los Angeles and New York, Korean immigrants can be found on almost every street corner running dry cleaners, nail salons, greengroceries, liquor stores, and flower shops. Many Korean shop owners provide services not only for other Korean Americans but also for other minorities and Whites. In fact, there is widespread recognition of Korean American small business ownership in the United States. Based on the 1980 U.S. Census, In-Jin Yoon estimated that about 12 percent of Korean Americans were self-employed in small businesses. Among the 17 ethnic groups that entered the United States between 1970 and 1980, according to Yoon, Korean immigrants marked the highest level of self-employment. The rate of self-employment among Korean Americans reached 17 percent in 1990.

This chapter examines the reasons for the greater propensity of Korean immigrants to pursue self-employment. First, around the time Korean immigrants began arriving in the United States in greater numbers, opportunities for self-employment opened up. Prior to the large influx of Korean American immigrants, many Jewish Americans operated the small businesses in the inner cities where Koreans now own their shops. However, second and third generation of Jewish population moved out of the inner cities in the 1960s and did not continue their parents‟ small businesses. Instead of taking over their parents‟ businesses, children of Jewish Americans moved into the mainstream labor market, with a substantial percentage going into professional and white-collar occupations. While many Jews left the inner cities, the number of consumers increased, thereby creating an increasing demand for replacements. Korean immigrants who arrived in the United States after 1965, thus, took advantage of the economic opportunities in these “abandoned cities.”

Why did Korean immigrants who came to the United States with relatively high levels of education see this phenomenon as an opportunity? First of all, their professional and middle class backgrounds did not protect them from racial discrimination and language barriers. Many Korean immigrants were not familiar with American customs and culture, and their college degrees from prestigious Korean universities were not often recognized. According to anthropologist Kyeyoung Park, it was impossible for Korean immigrants to apply their training in Korea unless they went back to school in the United States. Even if they went back to school in America, it was difficult for these first generation immigrants to master a new language, leaving them extremely disadvantaged when competing with native English speakers. Korean immigrants, therefore, decided to be self-employed in their own businesses despite the expected hardships of running small businesses. Studies suggest that the decision to pursue self- employment was not their personal preference but rather a survival strategy.

Second, for many Korean immigrants who faced language barriers and culture shock, small businesses offered the possibility of fostering a stable life in the United States. To run a small business was a solution for those who experienced discrimination in the mainstream labor market but wanted to support their family, raise children, and eventually invite their parents from Korea. Their businesses ultimately made it possible for many Korean immigrants to send their children to American colleges to obtain professional jobs in the American mainstream labor market.

In addition, the immigration process based on family reunification encouraged many Koreans to share their business expertise with their family members and other Korean immigrants. Korean store owners used a variety of resources within their community to start up businesses. Korean newspapers often had numerous advertisements about available businesses. Moreover, Korean churches became a place in which they used kye, a rotating credit association, to finance their businesses.

With the help of social networks and available resources, many Korean Americans started businesses in inner city neighborhoods where competition was less fierce and real estate prices were relatively cheaper. These business owners felt that running businesses in White middle class suburban neighborhoods would be more difficult because they would have to compete with the already existing corporate chain supermarkets. For those who had limited English proficiency and lacked financial resources, to open up a business in a low-income neighborhood was a stepping stone toward future business in safer middle class neighborhoods.

Self-employment assured a life of hard work with no guarantees of success, regardless of type or characteristic of the small business. In fact, small business owners were cheap laborers who put some of their earnings into the pockets of distributors. Many newly-arrived Korean Americans found themselves in the most physically exhausting and labor intensive businesses that required working long hours with their unpaid family members. For many Korean Americans, however, small businesses were a strategy for survival. To run a small business also meant an investment in the future of their children.

Nevertheless, because of their middleman position - between the manufacturer and the customer - Korean store owners eventually became targets of hostility from other minorities who wrongfully blamed Korean immigrants for taking opportunities away from them. These misconceptions and rumors led to interethnic conflicts.


“Relaxing in Koreatown,” 1986 (Photo from the Los Angeles Public Library Photo Collection)

References
1. Light, Ivan, and Bonacich, Edna (1988). Immigrant Entrepreneurs: Koreans in Los Angeles, 1965-1982. Berkeley: University of California Press.
2. Park, Edward (1993). “Competing Visions: Political Formation of Korean Americans in Los Angeles, 1992-1997.” Amerasia Journal, 24(1), 45-85.
3. Park, Kyeyoung (1997). The Korean American Dream. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.
4. Park, Lisa Sun Hee (2005). Consuming Citizenship: Children of Asian Immigrant Entrepreneurs. Stanford: Stanford University.
5. Yoon, In-Jin (1997). On My Own: Korean Businesses and Race Relations in America. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.






Click READ MORE for korean translation




© 미주 한인 역사

번역이찬행 (뉴욕주립대학교)
로스앤젤레스 한국교육원 2009




5장 한인 스몰 비지니스: 아메리칸 드림을 이루기 위한 노력

배경:

Korean small businesses in Los Angeles Koreatown, 1997 (Photo from the Los Angeles Public Library Photo Collection)

한인 이민자들은 스몰 비지니스를 오픈함으로써 도시의 경관을 바꾸어놓았다. 로스앤젤레스와 뉴욕같은 미국의 대도시에서 세탁소, 네일 가게, 청과물 가게, 리커 스토, 꽃 가게 등을 운영하는 한인들의 모습은 어디서나 쉽게 발견할 수 있다. 한인 가게들은 같은 한인들을 대상으로 영업을 할 뿐만 아니라 다른 마이너리티들과 백인들에게도 서비스를 제공하고 있다. 사실상 미국에서 한인들의 스몰 비지니스 참여도는 널리 알려져 있다. 1980년 인구 조사를 연구한 윤인진에 의하면 미주 한인의 12퍼센트 가량이 스몰 비즈니스에 종사하고 있으며 1970년과 1980년 사이 미국에 입국한 열일곱 소수민족 가운데 한인들은 가장 높은 자영업 비율을 보이고 있다. 한인들의 스몰 비즈니스 비율은 1990년에 17퍼센트까지 증가하였다.

이번 장은 한인 이민자들의 자영업 비율이 높은 이유를 검토한다. 무엇보다도 한인 21이민자들이 미국에 대규모로 이민을 올 무렵 자영업 문호는 개방되어 있었다. 한인 이민자들의 유입에 앞서 유태계 미국인들이 도시 빈민 지역에서 스몰 비지니스를 운영하고 있었다. 하지만 1960년대 유태계 2, 3세들은 부모 세대들과는 달리 도시 빈민 지역을 벗어났으며 부모들의 스몰 비지니스를 물려받지도 않았다. 그들은 부모 세대의 비지니스를 계속하지 않고 주류 사회의 노동 시장에 뛰어들어 상당수가 전문직종과 화이트 칼라 일자리를 차지하였다. 유태계가 도시를 떠났지만 소비자들의 숫자는 증가하여 유태계를 대체할 집단에 대한 필요성이 높아졌다. 1965년 이후 미국에 이민 온 한인들은 이처럼 버려진 도시들의 경제적 기회를 이용하였다.

상대적으로 고등 교육을 받고 이민 온 한인들은 왜 이러한 현상을 기회로 보았을까? 첫째, 한인들은 전문직종 근무와 미들 클래스라는 배경을 지니고 있었지만 이러한 점들은 한인들을 인종 차별과 언어 장벽으로부터 보호하지 못했다. 대부분의 한인들은 미국의 관습과 문화에 익숙하지 않았으며 한국의 명문대학 출신이라는 점도 종종 미국에서는 인정받지 못했다. 인류학자인 박계영 교수에 의하면 한인 이민자들이 미국에서 학교에 다시 다니지 않는 한 그들이 한국에서 받은 교육을 미국 현지에서 적용하기란 불가능했다. 설령 한인들이 미국 학교에 다시 다닌다고 하더라도 한인 1세대들이 새로운 언어를 자유롭게 구사한다는 것은 어려웠고 그 결과 한인들은 미국인들과의 경쟁에서 매우 불리한 처지에 놓였다. 이러한 이유로 한인 이민자들은 스몰 비지니스 운영이라는 것이 여러 어려움이 있음에도 불구하고 자영업을 시작하기로 결정했다. 연구에 의하면 자영업 선택은 한인들의 개인적인 선호가 아니라 일종의 생존 전략이나 다름없었다.

둘째, 언어 장벽과 문화적 충격에 직면한 한인들에게 스몰 비지니스는 미국에서 안정된 삶을 영위할 가능성을 제공하였다. 주류 사회의 노동 시장에서 차별을 경험했지만 자신의 가족을 책임지고 아이들을 키우며 한국에서 부모들을 초청하려는 한인들에게 스몰 비지니스는 해결책이 되었다. 결국 스몰 비지니스 덕택에 많은 한인들은 자녀들을 미국 대학에 진학시킬 수 있었으며 그들이 주류 사회에서 전문직에 종사하는 것이 가능했다.

게다가 가족 재결합에 기반한 이민 과정은 한인들이 가족 구성원들 및 다른 한인들과 비지니스 전문 정보를 쉽게 공유하도록 만들었다. 한인들은 비지니스를 시작하기 위해 한인 커뮤니티의 다양한 재원을 이용하였다. 한인 신문들의 지면은 비지니스에 대한 광고들로 채워지기도 했다. 나아가 한인 교회들은 한인들이 비지니스에 자금을 마련하기 위해 계를 하는 장소로도 활용되었다.

사회적인 네트워크와 이용 가능한 재원을 동원함으로써 한인들은 경쟁도 덜 치열하고 부동산 값도 상대적으로 저렴한 도시 빈민 지역에서 비지니스를 시작하였다. 한인 비지니스 주인들은 교외 지역의 백인 미들 클래스를 상대로 영업을 한다는 것은 기존의 대형 체인망 및 쇼핑몰과 경쟁을 해야 하기에 훨씬 어려울 것이라고 생각하였다. 영어 사용에 문제가 있고 충분한 자금력도 없는 사람들에게 있어 저소득층 지역에서 비지니스를 오픈한다는 것은 훗날 보다 안전한 미들 클래스 지역에 자신의 사업체를 운영하기 위한 발판이었다.

스몰 비지니스의 형태와 특성과는 상관없이 자영업이라는 것은 성공의 보장없이 고된 노동을 수반한다는 점을 이해하는 것이 중요하다. 사실상 스몰 비지니스를 운영하는 사람들은 저렴한 노동자들로서 그들의 수입 가운데 일부분은 도매업자들의 주머니로 들어가기 마련이다. 갓 이민 온 많은 한인들은 육체적으로 고단하고 노동 집약적인 비지니스에서 일했으며 가족 성원들까지 임금을 받지 않고 장시간 일하곤 했다. 하지만 한인들에게 스몰 비지니스는 하나의 생존 전략이었다. 그것은 또한 아이들의 미래에 대한 투자였다.

그럼에도 불구하고 중간자로서의 위치, 즉 제조업자와 고객 사이에 놓여 있는 위치 때문에 한인들은 다른 마이너리티들로부터 적대시되곤 했다. 이들 마이너리티들은 한인 이민자들이 자신들로부터 기회를 빼앗아간다고 비난했다. 이러한 오해와 소문들은 인종간 갈등으로 귀결되었다.


“Relaxing in Koreatown,” 1986 (Photo from the Los Angeles Public Library Photo Collection)



참고문헌
1. Light, Ivan, and Bonacich, Edna (1988). Immigrant Entrepreneurs: Koreans in Los Angeles, 1965-1982. Berkeley: University of California Press.
2. Park, Edward (1993). “Competing Visions: Political Formation of Korean Americans in Los Angeles, 1992-1997.” Amerasia Journal, 24(1), 45-85.
3. Park, Kyeyoung (1997). The Korean American Dream. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.
4. Park, Lisa Sun Hee (2005). Consuming Citizenship: Children of Asian Immigrant Entrepreneurs. Stanford: Stanford University.
5. Yoon, In-Jin (1997). On My Own: Korean Businesses and Race Relations in America. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.




✎ From the ☾ moon that shines bright as a shooting star ☆

No comments:

Post a Comment