Thursday, April 19, 2012

D-day 10: I am Korean-American

BECAUSE history can't be erased when there are people who knows how we came here


Today i've learn something very important
and if you are Korean living in the US,
this is a must!


D-day to April 29, 1992
everyday from now i'll be posting a bit of history from a researched paper
(intention is to share the knowledge)



Chapter 1 The First Wave of Korea Immigration
Chapter 2 Korean Picture Brides and the Korean Independence Movement in America
Chapter 3 The Korean War and the Second Wave of Korean Immigration
Chapter 4 The Immigration Act of 1965 and a New Group of Korean Americans
Chapter 5 Striving for the American Dream and Korean Small Businesses
Chapter 6 Korean Churches in the United States
Chapter 7 Los Angeles Koreatown: Past and Present
Chapter 8 Korean Americans and Education
Chapter 9 Korean American Ethnic Identity
Chapter 10 Los Angeles Riots 1992 and the Remaking of Korean American Ethnic Identity



**Rightful credit goes to:**


© Korean American History

Hyeyoung Kwon (University of Southern California)
Chanhaeng Lee (State University of New York at Stony Brook)
Korean Education Center in Los Angeles 2009

Chapter 1 The First Wave of Korean Immigration

Background:
Korean American history is not well known among American students. When one asks students whether they learned Korean American history while growing up or attending school, the answer is usually no.Even though Korean American history is not covered in U.S. history textbooks, it does not invalidate the experiences of Korean immigrants. Like any other Asian group in America, Korean Americans have historically been active participants in the making of what America was and is.
Korea was not receptive to foreign influences after the seventeenth century because of its turbulent experiences of invasions by neighboring countries. Due to the devastating effects of the Japanese invasions (1592 and 1597) and the Manchu invasions (1627 and 1636), Korea avoided interactions with foreign countries except China for more than two and a half centuries during which it was called the Hermit Kingdom.After a Japanese ship Unyo was driven away by the Koreans in 1875, however, Korea was forced to accept the disadvantageous foreign relations by signing the Treaty of Kanghwa of 1876 with Japan.


Under the treaty, the Japanese took over Korea‟s right to foreign trade. The treaty brought a self-imposed isolation of Korea to an end and eventually paved the way for other unequal international treaties with Western powers. The presence of foreigners turned the Korean peninsula into a battlefield in which the Sino-Japanese War (1894-95) and the Russo-Japanese War (1904-1905) were fought over. After winning these two major battles, Japan formally declared Korea as its protectorate.
During these years of socioeconomic crises, Horace N. Allen, a Protestant medical missionary and a diplomat from the United States, convinced King Kojong to permit the emigration of Koreans to Hawaii. The timing was ideal for Allen to persuade King Kojong, since massive natural disasters of famine and drought devastated Korean farmers in the beginning of the 1900s. Farmers who had lost their major source of income and food started moving to port cities such as P„yŏngyang and Inch„ŏn in order to find work. Along with other recruiters from the United States, Allen convinced these farmers to work in the Hawaiian plantations. Nevertheless, few Korean farmers expressed much interest in leaving their homeland until the missionaries like the Rev. George H. Jones, Dr. and Mrs. H. G. Underwood, and the Rev. Henry 1G. Appenzeller actively convinced members of their congregations to go to Hawaii, a “Christian land full of opportunities.”

Horace N. Allen (Photo from the Presbyterian Historical Society)

There were many newspaper advertisements that boasted about life in Hawaii. Many Koreans who faced poverty and political instability at the time were lured by the advertisements promising free housing, decent wages, and medical care. Recruiters described Hawaii as “the paradise island” to attract more people to leave Korea and work in Hawaiian plantations. Many Koreans also borrowed money from a bank in Inch„ŏn which was established by a recruiter David Deshler. Funded only by the Hawaiian Sugar Plantation Association, Deshler‟s Bank lent the Koreans one hundred dollars to finance transportation fees. Once the workers arrived and began working on the plantations, the bank expected that it could take out money from their paychecks to pay back their debts. As a result of the active recruitment efforts of missionaries and recruiters, Koreans from diverse backgrounds such as ex-soldiers, farmers, government clerks, artisans, and laborers immigrated to Hawaii.
Around this time, Japanese plantation workers in Hawaii were frequently engaged in labor protests to fight against low wages and dreadful working conditions: 34 labor strikes were made by the Japanese between 1900 and 1905. To offset the rebellion of Japanese plantation workers, who then made up two-thirds of the entire plantation work force on the islands, the plantation owners showed great interest in recruiting Korean workers who were portrayed as “more obedient and respectful to their employers than any other Orientals.”

S.S. Gaelic (Photo from www.koamhistory.com)

There were a handful of Korean diplomats, students, and merchants who came to the United States between 1883 and 1902. It was not until the S. S. Gaelic, a merchant ship with 102 Koreans, landed at the Port of Honolulu did the number of Korean immigrants increase significantly. Most of these Korean migrants had lived in cities before migrating to Hawaii. The group also consisted primarily of single males: nine out of ten Korean immigrants from 1903 and 1905 were male. Furthermore, due to the recruitment efforts of missionaries, 40 percent of Korean immigrants during this period were Christians.
Between 1903 and 1905, there were approximately 7,000 Korean immigrants in Hawaii. However the immigration door was closed in 1905 when the Korean government was forced to sign the Japanese Protectorate Treaty over Korea also known as the Ŭlsa Treaty. The Japanese government terminated issuing visas to Koreans for two reasons: to protect Japanese laborers in Hawaii from competition with Korean workers, as well as to prevent the Korean national independence movement in the United States.

Easurk Emsen Charr‟s Korean passport (Photo from the photographic collection of the Korean American Archive, University of Southern California)

Life in Hawaii was very difficult for the Korean pioneers. They woke up early in the morning by a loud siren and worked approximately ten hours a day for sixteen dollars a month. Workers wore ID number tags around their necks and had to keep their bodies bent over all day. Cutting sugar cane required such gruesome labor that their hands were full of blisters and badly cut by the sugar cane. Easurk Emsen Charr, who immigrated to Hawaii at the age of ten, recalled in his autobiography The Golden Mountain as follows:
A mansize pickaxe was given to me with which to work. I was to cut down the brushwood and to dig up the roots with it. That pickaxe was so big and heavy, and my hands so small and tender, that pretty soon both of my palms blistered and began to bleed.

In the sugar plantations, a luna, an overseer or supervisor on a horse, strode through the plantation and watched over the workers. When they caught those who were not working, the lunas often whipped them. Women who worked in the camps side-by-side with the men received even less pay for their labor. Some women worked in the camps doing laundry, making clothes, and cooking. According to Ronald Takaki, “Their knuckles became swollen and raw from using the harsh yellow soap.”

Bronze of a Korean woman of Koloa plantation in Hawaii by Jan Gordon Fisher in 1985 (Photo from the Historical Marker Database)

Between 1904 and 1907, about 1,000 Koreans who initially immigrated to Hawaii moved to different locations in the mainland to pursue better opportunities. For example, some Koreans worked in the mines of Utah, Colorado, and Wyoming while others moved to Alaska‟s salmon fisheries. Some Koreans settled in Arizona or California and built the railroads. Due to their relatively small number, however, the Koreans in the mainland could not develop their own communities.

References
1. Charr, Easurk Emsen (1961). Golden Mountain. Boston: Forum Publishing Company. 2. Choy, Bong-Youn (1979). Koreans in America. Chicago: Nelson-Hall. 3. Kim, Ronyoung (1986). Clay Walls. Seattle: University of Washington Press. 4. Kwon, Ho-Youn, Kim, Kwang Chung, and Warner, R. Stephen (2001). Korean
Americans and Their Religions: Pilgrims and Missionaries from a Different Shore.
University Park, PA: The Pennsylvania State University Press. 5. Patterson, Wayne (2000). The Ilse: First-Generation Korean Immigrants in Hawaii,
1903-1973. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press and Center for Korean Studies. 6. Patterson, Wayne (1988). The Korean Frontier in America: Immigration to Hawaii,
1896-1910. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press. 7. Takaki, Ronald (1998). Strangers from a Different Shore. Boston: Little, Brown and
Company.




Click on READ MORE for Korean translation

© 미주 한인 역사

번역: 이찬행 (뉴욕주립대학교)
로스앤젤레스 한국교육원 2009



배경:
미주 한인의 역사는 미국 학생들에게 잘 알려지지 않은 분야이다. 학생들에게 지금까지 자라면서 혹은 학교에 다니면서 미주 한인 역사에 대해 배운 적이 있느냐고 질문하면 대부분의 대답은 그렇지 않다이다. 하지만 한인 이민자들의 경험은, 비록 그것이 미국사 교과서들에서 제대로 다루어지지 않고 있음에도 불구하고, 결코 부정될 수는 없다. 다른 아시안계 이민자들과 마찬가지로 한인 이민자들은 미국의 과거와 현재를 만드는 데 능동적으로 참여해왔다.
한국은 이웃 국가들로부터 침략을 경험하면서 17세기 이후 외국의 영향을 잘 받아들이지 않았다. 1592년과 1597년 두 차례에 걸친 일본의 침략과 1627년과 1636년의 만주족 침략으로 말미암아 한반도는 황폐화되었으며 이후 한국은 250년 이상 동안 중국을 제외한 외부와의 접촉을 피하면서 은둔의 왕국으로 일컬어졌다. 하지만 1875년 일본 선박 운요호가 강화도 수병들에 의해 퇴각당하는 사건을 계기로 한국은 1876년 일본과 강화도조약에 서명하면서 외국과의 불리한 외교 관계를 받아들일 수밖에 없게 된다.

강화도조약으로 일본은 한국의 교역권을 차지했다. 강화도조약은 한국이 그동안 스스로에게 부과해왔던 고립을 끝내면서 궁극적으로 서구 열강들과 맺게 되는 불평등 조약의 시초가 되었다. 한반도에 외국인들이 들어오면서 국토는 전쟁터로 변했으며 청일전쟁(1894-95)과 러일전쟁(1904-05)을 겪게 된다. 두 차례에 걸친 전쟁에서 승리한 일본은 한국을 보호국으로 공식 선언했다.

이러한 사회경제적 위기의 시기에 미국의 프로테스탄트 의료 선교사이자 외교관인 호레이스 알렌은 고종에게 한인들의 하와이 이주를 허락하도록 설득했다. 당시 한국은 1900년대 초반부터 시작된 기근과 가뭄 등의 대규모 자연 재해로 말미암아 수많은 농부들의 삶이 황폐해진 상황이었는데, 이는 알렌이 고종을 설득하는 데 있어 유리한 배경으로 작용했다. 수입과 식량의 주요 원천을 잃은 농부들은 일자리를 구하기 위해 평양과 인천 등지의 항구 도시로 이주했으며 알렌은 이들 농부들에게 하와이 플랜테이션에서 일할 것을 추천했다. 하지만 선교사들(예컨대, the Rev. George H. Jones, Dr. and Mrs. H. G. Underwood, and the Rev. Henry G. Appenzeller)이 자신들의 신도들에게 하와이, 기회로 가득찬 그리스도의 나라로 갈 것을 적극적으로 설득할 때까지 실질적으로 고국을 떠날 생각을 한 농부들은 극소수에 불과했다.

Horace N. Allen (Photo from the Presbyterian Historical Society)

당시 신문들의 광고는 하와이에서의 삶을 크게 부각시켰다. 가난과 정치적 불안정에 허덕이던 한인들은 무료 주택, 좋은 임금, 의료 서비스 등을 약속했던 신문 광고들에 끌리기 마련이었다. 하와이에 대한 묘사 가운데는 천국의 섬이라는 문구가 있었는데 이는 보다 많은 한인들이 고국을 떠나 하와이 플랜테이션에서 일하도록 유도했다. 한인들은 인력 모집책인 데이비드 데쉴러가 인천에 설립한 데쉴러 은행으로부터 돈을 빌리기도 했다. 하와이 사탕수수 플랜테이션 협회의 자본금으로만 설립된 데쉴러 은행은 한인들이 플랜테이션에 도착하여 일을 시작하면 이들이 받는 월급에서 빚을 갚는 용도로 일정액을 공제하겠다는 조건으로 100달러씩을 교통비로 빌려주었다. 선교사들과 모집책들의 적극적인 노력의 결과 다양한 배경의 한인들(전직 군인, 농부, 정부 관리, 장인, 노동자)이 하와이로 이주했다.

당시 한인들보다 먼저 하와이로 이주하여 플랜테이션에서 일하고 있던 일본인 노동자들은 낮은 임금과 열악한 노동 환경에 맞서 노동 쟁의를 벌이고 있었다. 통계에 의하면 1900년부터 1905년 사이에 일본인 노동자들은 34회의 파업을 단행한 바 있다. 따라서 농장주들은 하와이 전체 플랜테이션 노동력의 2/3 정도를 차지하고 있던 일본인 노동자들의 반란을 억누르기 위해 다른 어떤 동양인들보다 순종적이며 고용주를 존경한다고 알려진 한인 노동자들을 모집하는 데 커다란 관심을 보이게 됐다.

S.S. Gaelic (Photo from www.koamhistory.com)

1883년과 1902년 사이 미국에 왔던 한인들은 극소수로서 대부분은 외교관, 학생, 상인들이었다. 102명의 한인들을 태운 미국 상선 갤릭호가 호놀롤루 항구에 도착한 뒤에야 한인 이민자들의 숫자는 크게 증가하기 시작했다. 한인 이민자들은 하와이로

건너오기 전까지는 대부분 도시에서 살았다. 하와이에 도착한 최초의 한인 이민자들은 또한 대부분 독신 남성들이었으며 열에 아홉은 남자일 정도로 남녀 성비가 크게 균형을 잃었다. 선교사들이 한인들의 모집에 주력한 결과 1903년에서 1905년 사이에 미국에 온 한인들의 40퍼센트는 기독교 신자들이었다.

1903년부터 1905년까지 7천여 명의 한인들이 하와이로 이주했다. 하지만 1905년 을사조약이라고 알려진 제2차 한일협약이 한국과 일본 사이에 강제로 체결되면서 이민의 문호는 닫히고 말았다. 당시 일본 정부는 하와이 자국 노동자들을 한인 노동자들과의 경쟁으로부터 보호하고 미국에서 한인들이 펼치는 독립운동을 막기 위한 목적으로 비자 발급을 중단시켰다.

Easurk Emsen Charr‟s Korean passport (Photo from the photographic collection of the Korean American Archive, University of Southern California)

한인 이민 선구자들의 하와이 생활은 매우 고달팠다. 그들은 시끄러운 사이렌 소리를 들으면서 아침 일찍 잠에서 깨어나 하루에 대략 10시간 가까이 노동하고 월급으로 고작 16달러를 받았다. 한인 노동자들은 목에 번호표를 걸친 채 하루 종일 허리조차 제대로 펼 수 없을 정도로 일했다. 사탕수수를 자르는 일은 힘든 일이었기에 한인 이민 노동자들의 손은 물집 투성이로 변하여 심하게 갈라지기도 했다. 열 살이라는 어린 나이에 하와이로 이민을 왔던 차의석은 훗날 자서전인 The Golden Mountain에서 다음과 같이 회상한다.
어른 크기만한 곡괭이가 내게 주어졌다. 나는 그 커다란 곡괭이로 가지를 자르고 뿌리를 파야 했다. 그 곡괭이는 너무 크고 무거웠으며 내 손은 너무 작고 여렸다. 얼마 지나지 않아 내 두 손바닥에는 물집이 잡혔으며 피가 흐르고 말았다.
사탕수수 플랜테이션에서는 루나(luna)라고 불렸던 감독관이 말을 타고 돌아다니면서 노동자들을 감시했다. 이들 감독관들은 일하지 않고 있는 노동자들을 발견하면 종종 채찍질을 하기도 했다. 남자들과 나란히 캠프에서 일했던 여자들은 더욱 형편없는 임금을 받아야만 했다. 어떤 여자들은 캠프에서 빨래를 하거나 옷과 음식을 만들기도 했다. 역사학자인 로널드 타카키에 의하면 그들의 손목은 거친 노란 비누를 사용해서 부풀어 올라 피부가 벗겨져 있었다.”

Bronze of a Korean woman of Koloa plantation in Hawaii by Jan Gordon Fisher in 1985 (Photo from the Historical Marker Database)

하와이로 이주한 한인 가운데 대략 1천여 명은 1904년과 1907년 사이에 보다 더 좋은 기회를 찾아 미국의 다른 곳으로 떠났다. 예컨대, 몇몇 한인들은 유타, 콜로라도, 와이오밍 등지의 광산으로 이동하였고 일부는 알래스카까지 이주하여 연어잡이 수산회사에서 일을 했다. 한인들은 또한 애리조나와 캘리포니아에 정착하여 철도 건설에 참여하기도 했다. 그렇지만 미 본토에 있는 한인들의 규모는 상대적으로 작아 한인들만의 독자적인 커뮤니티를 만들기에는 어려움이 있었다.

참고문헌
1. Charr, Easurk Emsen (1961). Golden Mountain. Boston: Forum Publishing Company. 2. Choy, Bong-Youn (1979). Koreans in America. Chicago: Nelson-Hall. 3. Kim, Ronyoung (1986). Clay Walls. Seattle: University of Washington Press. 4. Kwon, Ho-Youn, Kim, Kwang Chung, and Warner, R. Stephen (2001). Korean
Americans and Their Religions: Pilgrims and Missionaries from a Different Shore.
University Park, PA: The Pennsylvania State University Press. 5. Patterson, Wayne (2000). The Ilse: First-Generation Korean Immigrants in Hawaii,
1903-1973. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press and Center for Korean Studies. 6. Patterson, Wayne (1988). The Korean Frontier in America: Immigration to Hawaii,
1896-1910. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press. 7. Takaki, Ronald (1998). Strangers from a Different Shore. Boston: Little, Brown and
Company.




✎ From the ☾ moon that shines bright as a shooting star ☆

No comments:

Post a Comment