Tuesday, April 24, 2012

D-day 5: I am Korean-American


Chapter 1 The First Wave of Korea Immigration
Chapter 2 Korean Picture Brides and the Korean Independence Movement in America
Chapter 3 The Korean War and the Second Wave of Korean Immigration
Chapter 4 The Immigration Act of 1965 and a New Group of Korean Americans
Chapter 5 Striving for the American Dream and Korean Small Businesses
Chapter 6 Korean Churches in the United States
Chapter 7 Los Angeles Koreatown: Past and Present
Chapter 8 Korean Americans and Education
Chapter 9 Korean American Ethnic Identity
Chapter 10 Los Angeles Riots 1992 and the Remaking of Korean American Ethnic Identity



**Rightful credit goes to:**

© Korean American History

Hyeyoung Kwon (University of Southern California)
Chanhaeng Lee (State University of New York at Stony Brook)
Korean Education Center in Los Angeles 2009




Chapter 6 Korean Churches in the United States

Background:

Honolulu Korean Methodist Church choir (Photo from the photographic collection of the Korean American Archive, University of Southern California)

Korean churches in the United States play a very important role for Korean immigrants. Historically, Korea was not a Protestant country. Rather, Buddhism and Confucianism were the two major religions that influenced the lives of Koreans. However, a large number of Korean immigrants have been associated with Christianity since the beginning of Korean American history. At the turn of the century, missionaries in Korea built schools and hospitals and provided various social services for Koreans. They were successful in spreading Christianity and made concerted efforts to recruit laborers that would eventually work in Hawaiian plantations. Approximately 40 percent of immigrants who went to work for Hawaiian plantations were Christians.

When Korea was colonized by Japan, the Korean immigrant church became a major place for the Korean national independence movement. After Korea was liberated and a large number of immigrants started to move to the United States, the immigrant church again became the center for community services and cultural activities. Studies suggest that approximately 70 percent of Koreans living in the United States are Christians. The leading Korean denomination is Presbyterian followed by Baptist, Methodist, and Full Gospel.

Americanization classat Korean Presbyterian Church in Los Angeles (Photo from the Los Angeles Public Library Photo Collection)

As mentioned in the previous chapter, a large number of Korean immigrants who arrived after 1965 were middle class professionals from urban areas. According to Kwang Chung Kim and Shin Kim, those who lived in the urban areas were more likely to associate with Christian religions than people living in rural areas. However, not all church goers were Christians before coming to the United States. Some initially went to churches to receive social services necessary to adjust to the American way of life and later became Christians. Though attending church for religious activities seems to be the primary motive behind high attendance rates, the social service and fellowship aspects of Korean churches help increase the number of Korean Christians in the United States.

For many Korean immigrants, churches also help them maintain their cultural and ethnic ties. Churches often serve Korean meals after services, celebrate Korean traditional and religious holidays, and house Korean language schools for the children of immigrants to learn the language of their homeland. Some church language schools have extensive summer programs focused on teaching Korean language and culture.

Today, Korean churches are mostly run by the first generation Korean male immigrants. Though many American-born children attend church with their parents, there is growing dissatisfaction expressed by English-speaking church attendees who feel that Korean immigrants mix religious activities with Korean traditions including gender inequality. While English speaking congregations are increasing, the generational and cultural gaps between the first generation Korean immigrants and American-born populations remain unresolved within many churches.

Despite some of these problems, churches play an important role in providing immigrants with social services. Pastors often serve as family counselors and are deeply involved in finding jobs for many immigrants. Members of church exchange all kinds of information ranging from education, health care, social security benefits to business know-how. Also, newly arrived immigrants who experience language barriers can receive language assistance.

In addition to the social services that many Korean churches provide, a number of immigrants attend Korean churches to make friends and socialize. Separated from their friends and family members in Korea, immigrants often feel isolated and lonely. Because adjusting to a new way of life is difficult, sharing stories with other immigrants in similar situations often helps them relieve stress and cope with their alienation and anxiety. Most churches also hold outdoor services accompanied by recreational activities such as sports, games, and singing in order to foster intimate circles of friendship among church goers.

Koreans get help from Father Matthew Ahn of St. Nicholas Episcopal Church in Hollywood, 1977 (Photo from the Los Angeles Public Library Photo Collection)

Finally, Korean churches provide opportunities for many immigrants to hold important positions and statuses. They often serve as elders, program directors, and youth group leaders. Many Korean immigrants held high social positions in Korea but could not maintain similar positions in the United States because of language barriers and other difficulties related to their assimilation. Korean churches provide meaningful positions for Korean immigrants who yearn for the social status that they had enjoyed in their homeland.

References
1. Chong, Kelly H. (1998). “What It Means To Be Christian: The Role of Religion in the Construction of Ethnic Identity and Boundary among Second Generation Korean Americans.” Sociology of Religion, 56(3), 259-286.
2. Kim, Rebecca Y. (2006). God’s New Whiz Kids?: Korean American Evangelicals on Campus. NY: New York University Press.
3. Kwon, Ho-Youn, Kim, Kwang Chung, and Warner, R. Stephen (2001). Korean Americans and Their Religions: Pilgrims and Missionaries from a Different Shore. University Park, PA: The Pennsylvania State University Press.
4. Min, Pyong Gap (1995). “Korean Americans.” In Pyong Gap Min (Ed.), Asian Americans: Contemporary Trends and Issues. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
5. Min, Pyong Gap (1992). “The Structure and Social Functions of Korean Immigrant Churches in the United States.” International Migration Review, 26(4), 1370-1394.
6. Shin, Eui Hang, and Park, Hyung. “An Analysis of Causes of Schisms in Ethnic Churches: The Case of Korean-American Churches.” Sociological Analysis, 49(3), 234- 248.

Click READ MORE for Korean translation


6장 미국의 한인 교회

배경:

Honolulu Korean Methodist Church choir (Photo from the photographic collection of the Korean American Archive, University of Southern California)

미국의 한인 교회는 한인 이민자들에게 매우 중요한 역할을 수행하고 있다. 역사적으로 한국은 기독교 국가가 아니었다. 오히려 불교와 유교가 한국인들의 삶에 영향을 끼친 주요 종교였다. 하지만 미주 한인 역사 초창기부터 많은 수의 한인들은 기독교와 연관되었다. 20세기 초반 한국에서 활동하던 선교사들은 학교와 병원을 설립했으며 다양한 사회 서비스를 한국인들에게 제공하였다. 선교사들은 기독교를 전파하는 데 성공했으며 결국 하와이 플랜테이션에서 일할 노동자들을 모집하는 데도 심혈을 기울였다. 그 결과 하와이 플랜테이션에 일하기 위해 온 이민자들의 40퍼센트 가량이 기독교 신자들이었다.

한국이 일본의 식민지가 되었을 때 한인 이민자 교회는 독립운동을 위한 주요 공간이 되었다. 해방 이후 이민자들의 숫자가 증가하였을 때 이민자 교회는 커뮤니티 서비스와 문화 활동의 구심점으로 기능했다. 연구에 의하면 미주 한인의 70퍼센트 가량이 기독교 신자이다. 지배적인 종파로는 장로교가 있으며 그 뒤를 이어 침례교, 감리교, 순복음교 등이 있다.

“Americanization class” at Korean Presbyterian Church in Los Angeles (Photo from the Los Angeles Public Library Photo Collection)

제5장에서 언급했듯이 1965년 이후 미국에 온 한인 이민자들의 상당 부분은 대도시 출신으로서 전문직에 종사하던 미들 클래스였다. 김광정과 김신의 연구에 의하면 대도시에 살았던 사람들은 농촌 사람들보다 기독교를 더 쉽게 받아들였다. 하지만 교회에 다니는 한인들 모두가 미국에 오기 전부터 기독교 신자였던 것은 아니다. 애초 몇몇은 미국의 생활 방식에 적응하기 위해 필수적인 사회 서비스를 받을 목적으로 교회에 나갔다가 훗날 기독교 신자가 되었다. 한인들이 교회에 나가는 주요 동기는 종교 활동인 것처럼 보이지만 한인 교회가 제공하는 사회 서비스와 친교의 측면도 미주 한인 기독교 신자들의 숫자를 늘리는 데 기여했다.

교회는 한인 이민자들의 문화적이고 민족적인 유대를 유지하는 데도 도움을 주고 있다. 교회는 종종 예배가 끝나면 한국 음식을 제공하기도 하며 한국의 전통적이고 종교적인 날들을 기념하기도 한다. 교회는 또한 이민자 자녀들을 위해 한글학교를 개설하기도 한다. 몇몇 교회의 한글학교는 여름방학 집중 프로그램을 통해 한글과 한국의 문화를 가르치고 있다.

오늘날 대부분의 한인 교회는 한인 이민 1, 특히 남성에 의해 운영되고 있다. 비록 미국에서 태어난 아이들도 부모와 함께 교회에 나가고 있지만 영어를 사용하는 신자들은 한인 이민자들이 남녀 불평등과 같은 한국의 전통과 종교 활동을 혼합하는 것에 대해 점점 불만을 표출하고 있다. 많은 교회에서 영어 사용 신자들이 증가하고 있지만 이민자와 미국에서 태어난 신자 사이의 문화 및 세대 차이는 해결되지 못한 상태로 남아 있다.

이러한 문제에도 불구하고 교회는 이민자들에게 사회 서비스를 제공하는 중요한 역할을 맡고 있다. 목사는 종종 가족 상담을 하기도 하며 일자리를 알선하기도 한다. 교회 신자들은 교육, 건강, 사회 보장 혜택, 비지니스 방법 등 온갖 종류의 정보를 교환한다. 또한 언어 장벽을 지니고 있는 갓 이민 온 사람들은 통역 도움도 받을 수 있다.

한인 교회들이 제공하는 사회 서비스 이외에도 이민자들은 친구 교제와 사회화를 목적으로 교회에 나가기도 한다. 한국에 있는 친구들과 가족들로부터 떨어져 지내는 이민자들은 외로움을 느끼기 쉽다. 새로운 생활 방식에 적응한다는 것은 어려운 일이다. 이민자들은 비슷한 상황에 놓여 있는 다른 이민자들과 이야기를 나눔으로써 스트레스를 덜고 소외와 불안에 대처하기도 한다. 대부분의 교회들은 야외 활동을 제공하여 스포츠, 게임, 노래 부르기 등과 같은 레크레이션을 통해 교회 신자들 사이에 친교 집단을 형성하기도 한다.

Koreans get help from Father Matthew Ahn of St. Nicholas Episcopal Church in Hollywood, 1977 (Photo from the Los Angeles Public Library Photo Collection)

마지막으로 한인 교회는 이민자들에게 중요한 위치와 신분을 유지할 수 있는 기회를 제공한다. 한인들은 교회에서 장로, 프로그램 디렉터, 청년부 리더 등으로 봉사한다. 많은 경우 한인들은 한국에서 높은 위치를 차지하고 있었으나 미국에서는 언어 장벽과 동화에 따르는 여러 어려움으로 말미암아 유사한 위치를 지닐 수 없었다. 교회는 한국에서 누렸던 사회적 신분에 대한 열망을 지니고 있는 한인들에게 의미 있는 위치를 제공하고 있다.

참고문헌
1. Chong, Kelly H. (1998). “What It Means To Be Christian: The Role of Religion in the Construction of Ethnic Identity and Boundary among Second Generation Korean Americans.” Sociology of Religion, 56(3), 259-286.
2. Kim, Rebecca Y. (2006). God’s New Whiz Kids?: Korean American Evangelicals on Campus. NY: New York University Press.
3. Kwon, Ho-Youn, Kim, Kwang Chung, and Warner, R. Stephen (2001). Korean Americans and Their Religions: Pilgrims and Missionaries from a Different Shore. University Park, PA: The Pennsylvania State University Press.
4. Min, Pyong Gap (1995). “Korean Americans.” In Pyong Gap Min (Ed.), Asian Americans: Contemporary Trends and Issues. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
5. Min, Pyong Gap (1992). “The Structure and Social Functions of Korean Immigrant Churches in the United States.” International Migration Review, 26(4), 1370-1394.
6. Shin, Eui Hang, and Park, Hyung. “An Analysis of Causes of Schisms in Ethnic Churches: The Case of Korean-American Churches.” Sociological Analysis, 49(3), 234- 248.

✎ From the ☾ moon that shines bright as a shooting star ☆

No comments:

Post a Comment