Sunday, April 22, 2012

D-day 7: I am Korean-American


Chapter 1 The First Wave of Korea Immigration
Chapter 2 Korean Picture Brides and the Korean Independence Movement in America
Chapter 3 The Korean War and the Second Wave of Korean Immigration
Chapter 4 The Immigration Act of 1965 and a New Group of Korean Americans
Chapter 5 Striving for the American Dream and Korean Small Businesses
Chapter 6 Korean Churches in the United States
Chapter 7 Los Angeles Koreatown: Past and Present
Chapter 8 Korean Americans and Education
Chapter 9 Korean American Ethnic Identity
Chapter 10 Los Angeles Riots 1992 and the Remaking of Korean American Ethnic Identity


**Rightful credit goes to:**

© Korean American History

Hyeyoung Kwon (University of Southern California)
Chanhaeng Lee (State University of New York at Stony Brook)
Korean Education Center in Los Angeles 2009






Chapter 4 The Immigration Act of 1965 and a New Group of Korean Americans

Background:
In 2000, the U.S. Census Bureau reported that there were 1,076,872 Koreans in the United States. What caused this dramatic increase in the Korean American population? Were there any changes in the political environment that facilitated such a rapid influx of immigrants from Korea? In this chapter, we answer these questions.

First and foremost, it is very important to understand what was happening in the United States around the time that it opened its doors to a large number of immigrants from Korea. The late 1960s and early 1970s in the United States was an era of the Civil Rights Movement. Working class individuals and other racial minorities joined the African American-led fight against racial and economic inequalities in the United States. Many activists carried slogans such as “Serve the People” and “Power to the People.”

Civil Rights march, Seattle, 1965 (Photo from the Museum of History & Industry Photograph Collection)

One of the byproducts of the Civil Rights Movement was the passage of the Immigration Act of 1965 which abolished “the 1920s system that favored immigrants of Western European origins.” More specifically, the Immigration Act of 1965 removed the token quotas placed on Asian immigration, and allowed a maximum of 170,000 Eastern Hemisphere immigrants to enter the United States per year. In addition, the law did not place any quota on immediate family members such as spouses, children under the age of eighteen, and parents of U.S. citizens.

President Lyndon B. Johnson signing the immigration reform bill of 1965 (Photo from the photographic collection of Lyndon B. Johnson Presidential Library and Museum)

The primary purpose of the Immigration Act of 1965 was family reunification. However, many Koreans who did not have family members in the United States at the time took advantage of another provision in the Immigration Act of 1965 which sought to recruit professionals and skilled workers from overseas. In 1969, according to Bill Ong Hing, 23.2 percent of Korean immigrants used the occupational categories. An additional 11.6 percent entered the United States as immigrant investors in the same year.

Many new Korean immigrants were highly skilled professionals from urban areas. Class background was not the only difference between the earlier Korean immigrants and the newcomers. Unlike the earlier Koreans who were mostly bachelors, new immigrants came to the United States with their families. They did not view themselves as “sojourners” or exiles, but saw themselves as immigrants seeking a stable life in the United States. Furthermore, many newly arrived immigrants entered the service or technology sectors instead of going into manufacturing and agricultural sectors like earlier immigrants.

What pushed these professionals to leave their homeland and immigrate to the United States? One important push factor was the political instability of South Korea after the Korean War. To briefly explain the political atmosphere, a military coup followed immediately after the collapse of Syngman Rhee‟s government. Consequently, Major General Chung Hee Park took over the government. Koreans‟ political right to criticize the government was severely restricted during his military dictatorship.

Chung Hee Park and the Military Coup of May 16, 1961 (Photo from the Overseas Koreans Foundation)

Under his leadership from 1961 to 1979, South Korea‟s export-oriented economy developed rapidly. Though the economy developed quickly in South Korea, the number of white-collar jobs did not match the number of highly educated Koreans in the city. More than one out of every four males with college degrees was unable to utilize their education to find professional or managerial jobs. This fierce competition thus pushed Koreans to seek better employment opportunities outside of Korea. In short, political instability and labor market competition of the 1960s and 1970s pushed many highly educated Koreans to immigrate to the United States.

However, what might have appeared as an open door policy did not last for too long. In 1976, for example, the provision that was designed to recruit medical doctors from overseas became restricted as a result of an intense lobby of the American Medical Association that feared competition with Korean physicians and surgeons. Almost simultaneously, the South Korean government introduced a law that restricted the emigration of large property holders and high- ranking military personnel. By this time, the restructured capitalist economy in Korea also improved the lives of upper-middle class Koreans. Therefore, since the 1980s, many wealthy Koreans have had the incentive to remain in Korea instead of leaving their homeland.

The change in immigration laws and the widening income inequality in South Korea affected the social structure of Korean Americans. Studies show that the median income of Korean Americans has declined while there has been an increase in the number of Korean Americans living below the poverty line because a greater proportion of working class from Korea have used their kinship ties with American citizens to enter the United States.

Though these newly arrived Korean immigrants came to the “land of opportunity” with hopes to achieve the American dream, they faced discrimination like many earlier immigrants. Korean immigrants educated in the fields of medicine, teaching, and administration realized that there were limited employment opportunities for racial minorities due to the non-transferability of educational capital and language barriers. A large number of these professional Korean immigrants resorted to opening their own small businesses such as liquor stores, greengroceries, and restaurants in segregated minority neighborhoods. The development of small businesses in the inner city eventually led to Sa-I-Gu, the violence and tragedy of the Los Angeles riots of 1992.

References
1. Chan, Sucheng (1991). Asian Americans: An Interpretive History. Boston: Twayne Publishers.
2. Hing, Bill Ong (1993). Making and Remaking Asian America through Immigration Policy, 1850-1990. Stanford: Stanford University Press.
3. Min, Pyung Gap (1995). “Korean Americans.” In Pyung Gap Min (Ed.), Asian Americans: Contemporary Trends and Issues. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
4. Yoon, In-Jin (1995). “Korean Immigration to the United States.” In Franklin Ng (Ed.), The Asian American Encyclopedia. New York: Marshall Cavendish.
5. Zhou, Min, and Gatewood, James V. (2007). Contemporary Asian America: A Multidisciplinary Reader. New York: New York University Press.




Click on READ MORE for Korean translation:





© 미주 한인 역사

번역이찬행 (뉴욕주립대학교)
로스앤젤레스 한국교육원 2009




제4장 1965년 이민법과 새로운 미주 한인 집단

배경:
2000년에 발표된 인구 조사에 의하면 미국에 살고 있는 한인은 1,076,872명이다. 무엇이 이러한 미주 한인 인구의 급격한 증가를 가져왔을까? 한국으로부터의 대규모 이민을 촉진하는 정치적 여건의 변화가 있었을까? 이번 장에서는 여기에 대해 알아본다.

무엇보다도 미국이 한국 이민자들에게 문호를 개방했을 무렵 미국에서는 어떠한 일이 발생하고 있었는지를 이해하는 것이 중요하다. 1960년대 말과 1970년대 초반의 미국은 민권운동의 시기였다. 노동계급과 인종적 마이너리티들은 아프리칸 아메리칸들이 주도하는 투쟁에 합류하여 미국의 인종 및 경제 불평등에 맞서 싸웠다. 당시 많은 활동가들은 민중을 섬겨라” “모든 권력을 민중에게로와 같은 슬로건을 들고 길거리로 나오기도 했다.

Civil Rights march, Seattle, 1965 (Photo from the Museum of History & Industry Photograph Collection)

서유럽 출신의 이민자를 선호했던 1920년대 이민법 시스템을 폐지한 1965년 이민법은 이러한 민권운동의 부산물 가운데 하나였다. 보다 구체적으로 말하자면, 1965년 이민법은 아시안 이민에 할당되었던 얼마 되지도 않던 쿼터를 제거하였으며 매해 17만 명에 달하는 동반구(東半球) 지역 출신 사람들의 미국 이민을 가능케 했다. 게다가 1965년 이민법은 배우자, 18세 미만의 자녀, 미국 시민의 부모 등 직계 가족 구성원의 이민에 어떠한 쿼터도 두지 않았다.

President Lyndon B. Johnson signing the immigration reform bill of 1965 (Photo from the photographic collection of Lyndon B. Johnson Presidential Library and Museum)

1965년 이민법의 1차 목적은 가족 재결합이었다. 하지만 당시 한국인은 미국에 가족이 있는 경우가 그다지 많지 않았기에 1965년 이민법의 다른 조항, 즉 해외로부터 전문 인력과 숙련직 종사자들을 모집하기 위해 마련된 조항을 이용하였다. 빌 옹 힝의 연구에 의하면 1969년 한 해 한인 이민자들의 23.2퍼센트가 이민법의 직업 조항을 이용해 이민을 왔다. 그리고 같은 해 11.6퍼센트의 한인들이 투자 이민 자격으로 이민을 온 것으로 조사됐다.

새로운 한인 이민자들은 도시 출신으로서 고급 기술력을 보유한 경우가 많았다. 기존의 이민자들과 새로운 이민자들 사이에는 계급적인 차이만 존재했던 것이 아니었다. 대부분 총각이었던 초기 한인 이민자들과는 달리 새로운 이민자들은 미국에 가족을 모두 데리고 왔다. 그들은 스스로를 임시 체류자 내지는 망명자로 생각하지 않고 미국에서의 안정적인 삶을 추구하는 이민자로 간주했다. 게다가 이들은 제조업 및 농업 부문에 뛰어든 초기 이민자들과는 달리 서비스 혹은 기술직 분야의 일자리를 구했다.

이들 전문 인력들로 하여금 고국을 떠나 미국 이민을 선택하도록 한 것은 무엇이었을까? 한 가지 중요한 요소는 한국전쟁 이후 한국의 정치적 불안정이었다. 당시 한국의 정치 상황을 간략히 설명하자면, 이승만 정권의 붕괴 이후 군사 쿠데타가 발발하여 결국 육군 소장이었던 박정희가 정권을 차지하였다. 박정희 군사독재시절 한국인들의 정치적 권리는 매우 제한받아 정부를 비판하는 것조차 쉽지 않았다.

Chung Hee Park and the Military Coup of May 16, 1961 (Photo from the Overseas Koreans Foundation)

한국에서는 1961년부터 1979년까지 박정희 정권의 주도로 수출 지향 경제가 급속도로 발전했다. 그런데 경제는 빠른 속도로 발전했지만 고등 교육을 받은 도시 사람들의 숫자에 비해 화이트 칼라 직종은 많이 부족했다. 대학 교육을 마친 네 명의 남성 가운데 한 명 이상이 자신의 교육 수준에 맞는 전문직이나 관리직 일자리를 구하지 못하고 있었다. 이러한 극심한 경쟁으로 말미암아 한국인들은 해외에서 일자리를 구할 수밖에 없었다. 요컨대 1960년대와 1970년대 정치적 불안정과 노동 시장의 경쟁 때문에 고등 교육을 받은 수많은 한국인들은 미국으로의 이민을 택하였다.

하지만 문호 개방처럼 보였던 미국의 이민 정책은 그다지 오래 지속되지 못했다. 예를 들어 해외에서 의사를 끌어오기 위해 고안된 조항은 한인 의사들과의 경쟁을 두려워했던 미국 메디칼 협회의 집요한 로비로 인해 1976년 결국 제한을 받게 되었다. 그와 동시에 한국 정부는 재산을 많이 보유한 사람들과 군 고위 인사들의 해외 이민을 금지하는 법안을 도입했다. 1970년대 후반 무렵에는 한국의 자본주의 경제가 새롭게 구성되면서 상류층의 삶도 많이 향상되었다. 그 결과 1980년대 이후 부유한 계층의 한국인들은 한국을 떠나는 것보다는 남아 있는 쪽을 택하였다.

이민법의 변화와 한국의 경제 불평등 확대는 미주 한인 사회 구조에도 영향을 미쳤다. 연구에 의하면 한국에서 노동계급의 상당 부분이 미국 시민과의 가족 연계를 통해 이민을 오고 있기 때문에 미주 한인의 평균 소득은 줄어든 반면에 빈곤층 이하의 삶을 살고 있는 한인 숫자는 증가세를 보이고 있다.

새로운 한인 이민자들은 아메리칸 드림을 이루기 위해 기회의 땅에 이민왔지만 초기 이민자들과 마찬가지로 차별에 직면하였다. 의료, 교직, 관리직 분야의 교육을 받은 한인 이민자들은 한국에서 받은 교육이 미국에서 제대로 인정받지 못하는 현실과 언어 장벽 등의 문제로 말미암아 인종적 마이너리티에게는 취업의 문호가 제한되어 있다는 사실을 깨달았다. 그 결과 많은 수의 한인 전문 인력들은 마이너리티 지역에 리커 스토, 청과물 가게, 레스토랑과 같은 스몰 비지니스를 오픈할 수밖에 없었다. 이러한 도시 빈민 지역에 스몰 비지니스를 형성하면서 한인들은 결국 사이구(Sa-I-Gu), 1992년 로스앤젤레스 폭동의

참고문헌
1. Chan, Sucheng (1991). Asian Americans: An Interpretive History. Boston: Twayne Publishers.
2. Hing, Bill Ong (1993). Making and Remaking Asian America through Immigration Policy, 1850-1990. Stanford: Stanford University Press.
3. Min, Pyung Gap (1995). “Korean Americans.” In Pyung Gap Min (Ed.), Asian Americans: Contemporary Trends and Issues. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
4. Yoon, In-Jin (1995). “Korean Immigration to the United States.” In Franklin Ng (Ed.), The Asian American Encyclopedia. New York: Marshall Cavendish.
5. Zhou, Min, and Gatewood, James V. (2007). Contemporary Asian America: A Multidisciplinary Reader. New York: New York University Press.






✎ From the ☾ moon that shines bright as a shooting star ☆

No comments:

Post a Comment