Saturday, April 28, 2012

D-day 1: I am Korean-American

Chapter 1 The First Wave of Korea Immigration
Chapter 2 Korean Picture Brides and the Korean Independence Movement in America
Chapter 3 The Korean War and the Second Wave of Korean Immigration
Chapter 4 The Immigration Act of 1965 and a New Group of Korean Americans
Chapter 5 Striving for the American Dream and Korean Small Businesses
Chapter 6 Korean Churches in the United States
Chapter 7 Los Angeles Koreatown: Past and Present
Chapter 8 Korean Americans and Education
Chapter 9 Korean American Ethnic Identity
Chapter 10 Los Angeles Riots 1992 and the Remaking of Korean American Ethnic Identity


**Rightful credit goes to:**
© Korean American History
Hyeyoung Kwon (University of Southern California)
Chanhaeng Lee (State University of New York at Stony Brook)
Korean Education Center in Los Angeles 2009


Chapter 10 The Los Angeles Riots of 1992 and the Remaking of Korean American Ethnic Identity

Background:


Burned out car on Florence Avenue west of Normandie, April 30, 1992 (Photo from the Los Angeles Times)

On April 29, 1992, Americans across the nation eyewitnessed the shocking pictures of racial violence in Los Angeles. Korean Americans‟ hopes and dreams were burned to the ground and their desperate pleas for help were neglected and ignored. This was the day a jury rendered their verdict on the case involving Rodney King, an African American, and four LAPD officers. Rodney King was seriously beaten by the police officers on March 3, 1991 and the entire incident was caught on tape. When the jury decided that they were not guilty, Los Angeles streets including Pico-Union, South Central Los Angeles, and other parts of Koreatown were soon stormed by violent insurgence. Stores were robbed and destroyed by looters, the streets were filled with fire and smoke, and innocent bystanders were injured and killed.

As a result of the riots, 52 lives were lost and 2,239 people were injured. About one billion dollars in damages were done to residences and businesses, and over 14,000 people were arrested. Korean immigrants were the major victim of the riots, and many store owners watched in disbelief as their stores burned. During the three day riots, 2,300 stores owned by Korean Americans were looted and/or burned in South Central Los Angeles and Koreatown. One Korean was killed and 46 Koreans were injured. The damages suffered by Koreans accounted for about 45 percent of the total loss of the riots.

There are competing explanations about what caused the riots. When mainstream reporters wrote about the riots, Korean immigrant views were left out and the media portrayed the riots as if they were caused exclusively by conflicts between the African American community and the Korean American community. However, it is crucial to fully understand the historical context of the incident. The Los Angeles riots of 1992 were caused by three factors: firstly, the explosion of anger against the American power structure that produces racial and economic inequality in the United States; secondly, a lack of multiethnic education that prevented Korean Americans and other minorities from understanding each other; and lastly, Korean Americans‟ lack of political representation.

Los Angeles experienced a massive economic change in the 1970s and 1980s. Due to the deindustrialization which means “a widespread, systematic disinvestment in the nation‟s basic productive capacity,” a number of mainstream capital and corporations moved to other areas or developing countries to abandon South Central Los Angeles that had been a predominantly African American residential area. Along with the mainstream capital, many African American middle class also left the area for more affluent neighborhoods. In the process of deindustrialization, according to Edward W. Soja, more than 70,000 jobs disappeared in Los Angeles between 1978 and 1982. The residents of South Central Los Angeles were one of the most severely hit victims by the plant closings and massive lay-offs. They were “deproletarianized” to be abandoned as an urban underclass.

Moreover, African Americans in South Central Los Angeles have been a victim of police brutality. Long before the Rodney King incident, a thirty nine year old African American woman, Eula M. Love was killed by two LAPD officers in 1979. Despite the fact that she didn‟t injure anybody, the officers shot her a dozen times. At least fifteen people were killed by LAPD officers in 1982. About 1,500 young African Americans in South Central Los Angeles were arrested in 1988 simply because of “looking suspicious” after LAPD introduced “Operation Hammer” in the name of anti-gang sweeps in the area.

As a number of Latino immigrants from Mexico and Central American countries, particularly from El Salvador and Guatemala, entered South Central Los Angeles, the area also experienced a dramatic change in demographic composition. A report found Latinos comprised 31 percent of the residents of South Central Los Angeles in 1980, but this figure reached 46 percent in 1990. However, more than 60 percent of these Latinos lived under the poverty line. They also competed with African Americans over increasingly scarce resources.

The abandonment of South Central Los Angeles by mainstream supermarkets and retail chains created an opening for Korean immigrants who faced discrimination in the mainstream labor market. Liquor stores and indoor swap meets were the two most conspicuous institutions that Korean immigrants invested in. A report estimated that there were 728 liquor stores in South Central Los Angeles. The ratio of liquor stores per resident in the area was three or four times higher than the ratio for the rest of Los Angeles. Even though they were designated as “liquor stores,” however, as Nancy Abelmann and John Lie pointed out, most of Korean liquor stores served as a neighborhood supermarket that sold groceries and offered check cashing services to the residents. Korean immigrants also helped reconstruct the local economy by innovating new forms of business establishment such as indoor swap meets. Similar to open-air markets in Korea, these indoor swap meets functioned as department stores by selling a variety of consumer goods from low-cost clothing, shoes, and electronics to jewelry.

With a strong belief in the American dream, Korean immigrants viewed America as a land of milk and honey. They worked hard day and night to accomplish the dream. By opening small businesses in South Central Los Angeles and reshaping the local economy as active agents, they filled the gap caused by the flight of supermarkets and retail chains. Unfortunately, however, Korean immigrants did not have enough opportunities to learn about other minorities who were their primary customers. Schools never taught Korean immigrants about the African American Civil Rights Movement that eventually gave more rights to minorities including Korean Americans.

To make matters worse, many Korean immigrants showed racial prejudice toward African Americans and Latinos. Before coming to the United States, Koreans absorbed the racist ideology disseminated by the U.S. cultural dominance in their homeland. By emphasizing their position as the “model minority,” Korean immigrants also attempted to dissociate themselves from African Americans and Latinos as a means of upward mobility within the racial hierarchy of the United States.

The absence of multicultural education also prevented other minorities from understanding the communication barrier that Korean immigrants faced. Due to their lack of verbal communication skills, Korean immigrants had difficulty in engaging in informal conversation with non-Koreans. A lack of knowledge of Korean immigrant hardship reinforced the notion among African Americans that Korean Americans were foreign intruders deliberately trying to take over their community.

“Walkathon”: The 15th anniversary of the Los Angeles riots of 1992, Los Angeles, April 21, 2007 (Photograph by Chanhaeng Lee)

It was Korean Americans‟ lack of political power that exacerbated their helplessness. Before the riots, as Edward J. W. Park pointed out, Korean Americans reproduced homeland politics within their own community. Political ties to homeland politics was political capital for Korean American community leaders. As is evident in the case of the Korean American Grocers Association, Korean Americans‟ participation in local politics was limited to protecting their economic interests by contributing their financial resources to politicians. However, the riots brought to an end the “politics of ethnic insularity” of Korean Americans. During and after the riots, Korean Americans did not receive any substantial help from politicians and came to believe that their lack of political power was responsible for their victimhood. In this sense, the riots awakened a political consciousness among Korean Americans. They realized that it would be necessary to improve the political power of Korean Americans and to articulate their interests in the politics of post-riots for the future of their community.

Unlike the mainstream media‟s portrayal, the Los Angeles riots of 1992 were not simply a conflict between African Americans and Korean Americans. Rather, the riots were an “over- determined” multiethnic clash caused by economic injustice, racial discrimination, police brutality, demographic change, cultural difference, and political imbalance.

The lessons are clear. Korean Americans who endured discrimination in the “land of opportunity” need to gain political representation to protect themselves. The Los Angeles riots of 1992 were a wake up call for many Korean Americans. On May 3, 1992, more than 30,000 Korean Americans gathered in Los Angeles for a Peace March. There was a clear message behind the march: Korean Americans would be willing to take part in making an America that allows people to have dignity, basic freedom, and common respect. The riots gave Korean Americans an opportunity to rethink their American dream in a multiethnic society. More importantly, the 1.5 and second generation Korean Americans began to play a critical role in representing the community and serving as a voice for the voiceless immigrants.

References
1. Bluestone, Barry, and Harrison, Bennett (1982). The Deindustrialization of America: Plant Closings, Community Abandonment, and the Dismantling of Basic Industry. New York: Basic Books.
2. Chang, Edward T. (1999). “The Post-Los Angeles Riot Korean American Community: Challenges and Prospects.” Korean and Korean American Studies Bulletin, 10: 6-26.
3. Kang, Connie. “Korean Americans Still Plagued by Riots‟ Effects.” Los Angeles Times, April 30, 1994.
4. Kelly, Robin D. G. (2000). “Slangin‟ Rocks...Palestinian Style: Dispatches from the Occupied Zones of North America.” In Jill Nelson (Ed.), Police Brutality: An Anthology. New York: W. W. Norton & Company.
5. Kim, Elaine (1993). “Home is Where the Han is: A Korean American Perspective on the Los Angeles Upheavals.” Social Justice, 20: 1-21.
6. Kim, Nadia (2004). “A View from Below: An Analysis of Korean Americans‟ Racial Attitude.” Amerasia Journal, 30(1): 1-24.
7. Min, Pyong Gap (1996). Caught in the Middle: Korean Communities in New York and Los Angeles. Berkeley: University of California Press.
8. Navarro, Armando (1994). “The South Central Los Angeles Eruption: A Latino Perspective.” In Edward T. Chang and Russell C. Leong (Eds.), Los Angeles-Struggle toward Multiethnic Community: Asian American, African American, and Latino Perspectives. Seattle: University of Washington Press.
9. Ong, Paul, and Hee, Suzanne (1992). Losses in the Los Angeles Civil Unrest, April 29- May 1, 1992. UCLA Center for Pacific Rim Studies.
10. Ong, Paul, Park, Kyeyoung, and Tong, Yasmin (1994). “The Korean-Black Conflict and the State.” In Paul Ong, Edna Bonacich, and Lucie Cheng (Eds.), The New Asian Immigration in Los Angeles and Global Restructuring. Philadelphia: Temple University Press.
11. Park, Edward J. W. (1998). “Competing Visions: Political Formation of Korean Americans in Los Angeles, 1992-1997.” Amerasia Journal, 24(1): 41-57.
12. Park, Edward J. W. (1996). “Our L.A.? Korean Americans in Los Angeles after the Civil Unrest.” In Michael J. Dear, H. Eric Schockman, and Greg Hise (Eds.), Rethinking Los Angeles. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
13. Soja, Edward W. (1989). Postmodern Geographies: The Reassertion of Space in Critical Social Theory. London: Verso.
14. Sugrue, Thomas J. (1996). The Origins of the Urban Crisis: Race and Inequality in Postwar Detroit. Princeton: Princeton University Press.




Click READ MORE for Korean translation





© 미주 한인 역사
번역: 이찬행 (뉴욕주립대학교)
로스앤젤레스 한국교육원 2009






101992LA 폭동과 한인 정체성의 재형성

배경:



Burned out car on Florence Avenue west of Normandie, April 30, 1992 (Photo from the Los Angeles Times)

1992429일 미국인들은 로스앤젤레스에서 벌어진 인종 폭력을 생생하게 목격했다. 한인들의 꿈과 희망은 불타버렸으며 도와달라는 처절한 절규는 철저하게 외면당했다. 429일은 아프리칸 아메리칸인 로드니 킹과 네 명의 LAPD 경찰관에 대한 배심원 판결이 있던 날이었다. 로드니 킹은 199133일 경찰로부터 심한 구타를 당했으며 이 모든 과정이 인근에 살던 한 남자의 캠코더 카메라에 담겼다. 배심원이 이들 경찰관들에게 무죄 판결을 내리자 피코-유니온, 사우스 센트럴 로스앤젤레스, 코리아타운 등의 길거리는 곧바로 폭력적인 항거로 가득 차게 되었다. 상점들은 약탈자들에 의해 파괴되었으며 길거리에는 화염과 연기가 가득했고 무고한 사람들이 상처를 입거나 피살당했다.

폭동으로 인해 52명이 숨졌으며 2,239명이 다쳤다. 대략 10억 달러 정도의 피해가 발생했으며 총 14,000명의 사람들이 체포됐다. 한인 이민자들은 주된 피해자들이었으며 수많은 상점 주인들이 자신들의 가게가 불타는 장면을 지켜봐야만 했다. 3일 동안 지속된 폭동으로 말미암아 사우스 센트럴 로스앤젤레스와 코리아타운에 있던 2,300개의 한인 소유 가게들이 약탈과 방화를 당했다. 한 명의 한인이 숨졌으며 46명의 한인들이 크게 부상을 입었다. 한인이 입은 피해는 전체 피해액의 45퍼센트 가량을 차지했다.

무엇이 폭동을 유발했는지에 관해서는 여러 가지 상충하는 해석들이 있다. 주류 언론들이 이 사건을 보도하는 경우 한인의 시각은 배제되었으며 마치 폭동이 전적으로 아프리칸 아메리칸과 한인 커뮤니티 사이의 갈등으로 인해 발생한 것인 양 묘사됐다. 하지만 사건의 역사적 맥락을 이해하는 것이 중요하다. 1992년 로스앤젤레스 폭동을 유발한 원인들은 다음과 같은 세 가지 측면에서 이해할 수 있다. 첫째, 미국의 인종 및 경제 불평등을 야기했던 권력 구조를 향한 분노의 폭발. 둘째, 한인과 다른 마이너리티들이 상대방에 대해 배우고 이해할 수 있는 다인종 교육의 부재. 셋째, 한인의 정치력 부족.

로스앤젤레스는 1970년대와 1980년대에 대대적인 경제 변화를 경험했다. “국가의 기본적인 생산 능력에 대한 광범위하고 체계적인 탈투자(disinvestment)”를 의미하는 탈산업화 현상으로 말미암아 수많은 주류 사회 자본과 기업체들이 아프리칸 아메리칸들이 밀집해서 거주해왔던 사우스 센트럴 로스앤젤레스를 버리고 다른 지역이나 해외의 개발도상국으로 자리를 옮겼다. 주류 사회 자본과 함께 아프리칸 아메리칸 미들 클래스들도 보다 부유한 지역으로 떠났다. 에드워드 소자의 연구에 따르면 이와 같은 탈산업화 과정에서 1978년과 1982년 사이 약 7만개의 일자리가 사라졌다. 사우스 센트럴 로스앤젤레스 주민들은 공장 폐쇄와 대대적인 해고에 가장 심하게 타격을 받은 희생자들 가운데 하나였다. 그들은 탈프롤레타리아트화되어 도시의 언더클래스(underclass)로 내버려지고 말았다.

나아가 사우스 센트럴 로스앤젤레스의 아프리칸 아메리칸 주민들은 경찰 폭력의 희생자였다. 로드니 킹 사건보다 훨씬 이전인 1979년에 39세의 아프리칸 아메리칸 여성인 율라 M. 러브는 두 명의 LAPD 경찰관들에 의해 피살당했다. 그녀는 그 누구에게도 상해를 입히지 않았음에도 불구하고 경찰관들은 12발 이상 총을 발사해 그녀를 죽게 만들었다. 1982년에는 최소한 15명의 아프리칸 아메리칸들이 경찰에 의해 숨졌다. LAPD가 갱단을 척결한다는 구실로 “Operation Hammer”를 도입한 이후 1988년에는 약 1,500명 가량의 아프리칸 아메리칸 청년들이 단순히 의심스러워 보인다는 이유만으로 체포되기도 했다.

멕시코와 중남미 국가들, 특히 엘 살바도르와 과테말라 출신의 라티노 이민자들이 대거 사우스 센트럴 로스앤젤레스에 유입되면서 이 지역은 또한 대대적인 인구 구성의 변화를 경험했다. 연구에 의하면 라티노들은 1980년에 사우스 센트럴 로스앤젤레스 주민의 31퍼센트를 차지했으나 1990년에는 이 비율이 46퍼센트로 증가했다. 하지만 이 지역에 거주하던 라티노들의 60퍼센트 이상은 최저 빈곤선 이하의 삶을 살고 있었다. 그들은 또한 점차 희소해지는 재원을 놓고 아프리칸 아메리칸들과 경쟁을 벌였다.

주류 사회 수퍼마켓과 소매 체인점들이 사우스 센트럴 로스앤젤레스 지역을 버렸지만 이러한 현상은 주류 노동 시장에서 차별을 겪고 있던 한인들에게 하나의 기회를 만들어줬다. 리커 스토와 실내 스왑 밋은 한인 이민자들의 투자가 가장 눈에 띄는 분야였다. 어느 한 연구 보고에 의하면 사우스 센트럴 로스앤젤레스 지역에는 728개의 리커 스토가 있었다. 이 지역 주민 한 명당 리커 스토 숫자는 로스앤젤레스 다른 지역의 3배 내지는 4배에 달할 정도였다. 하지만, 낸시 아벨만과 존 리가 지적하듯이, 이러한 업소들이 비록 리커 스토라고 명명되었지만 대부분의 경우에는 주민들에게 채소를 팔고 첵 캐싱 서비스를 제공하는 동네 수퍼마켓으로 기능했다. 한인 이민자들은 또한 실내 스왑 밋과 같은 새로운 형태의 비지니스를 설립함으로써 지역 경제의 활성화를 도왔다. 한국의 벼룩시장과 유사한 이 실내 스왑 밋은 백화점의 역할을 했으며 저렴한 옷, 신발, 가전 제품에서부터 보석류에 이르기까지 다양한 물건을 판매했다.

아메리칸 드림에 대해 확고한 믿음을 지녔던 한인 이민자들은 미국을 젖과 꿀이 흐르는 땅으로 간주했다. 그들은 꿈을 이루기 위해 밤낮을 가리지 않고 열심히 일했다. 사우스 센트럴 로스앤젤레스 지역에 스몰 비즈니스를 오픈하고 능동적인 행위자로서 지역 경제의 활성에 기여한 한인들은 수퍼마켓과 소매 체인점들이 이탈한 뒤에 남은 공백을 메웠다. 하지만 불행하게도 한인 이민자들은 자신들의 고객인 다른 마이너리티들에 대해 배울 수 있는 충분한 기회를 갖지 못했다. 한인 이민자들은 자신들과 같은 마이너리티들에게도 권리를 부여하는 데 기여한 미국의 민권운동에 대해 학교에서 제대로 배우지 못했다.

설상가상으로 한인 이민자들은 아프리칸 아메리칸과 라티노에 대해 인종주의적인 선입견을 보이기도 했다. 한인들은 미국으로 이민을 오기 전부터 미국의 문화적 지배에 의해 유포된 인종 이데올로기를 받아들였다. 또한 모델 마이너리티라는 것을 강조함으로써 한인 이민자들은 스스로를 아프리칸 아메리칸과 라티노로부터 구별하여 미국의 인종 위계제에서 상층으로 올라가고자 했다.

다문화 교육의 부재 역시 한인 이민자들의 의사 소통 어려움에 대한 다른 마이너리티들의 이해를 가로막았다. 언어 문제 때문에 한인 이민자들은 타인종과 비공식적으로 소통하는 데 어려움을 겪었다. 한인 이민자들이 지니고 있는 어려움을 알 수 없었기에 아프리칸 아메리칸들은 한인들이 자신들의 커뮤니티를 의도적으로 차지하려고 하는 외국의 침입자라고 믿었다.

“Walkathon”: The 15th anniversary of the Los Angeles riots of 1992, Los Angeles, April 21, 2007 (Photograph by Chanhaeng Lee)

한인들의 곤경을 더욱 악화시켰던 것은 바로 정치력 부족이었다. 에드워드 J. W. 박에 의하면 폭동이 발발하기 전까지 한인들은 한국의 정치를 자신들의 커뮤니티 안에 재생산하고 있었다. 한인 커뮤니티 리더들에게는 한국 정치와의 정치적 연결이 정치적 자본이었다. 한미식품상협회의 사례에서 잘 드러나듯이 로컬 정치에 대한 한인들의 참여는 정치인들에게 재정적인 지원을 함으로써 자신들의 경제적 이해 관계를 보호하는 수준에 머물렀다. 하지만 1992년 폭동과 더불어 이와 같은 한인들의 에스닉 측면에서 단절된 정치는 종말을 고했다. 폭동 과정에서 그리고 그 이후 단계에서 한인들은 기존의 정치인들로부터 어떠한 실질적인 도움도 받지 못하자 이윽고 정치력 부족으로 인해 자신들이 희생당했다고 믿게 되었다. 이런 측면에서 1992년 폭동은 한인들의 정치 의식을 각성시켰다고 말할 수 있다. 한인들은 커뮤니티의 미래를 위해서는 폭동 이후 전개되는 정치 과정에 자신들의 이해 관계를 분명히 밝히고 정치력을 신장하는 것이 필수적이라고 깨달았다.

주류 언론의 보도와는 달리 1992년 로스앤젤레스 폭동은 단순한 한흑 갈등이 아니었다. 그것은 오히려 경제적 불평등, 인종 차별, 경찰 폭력, 인구 변화, 문화 차이, 그리고 정치적 불균형이 야기한 과잉 결정된다인종간의 충돌이었다.

1992년 폭동의 교훈은 명확하다. “기회의 땅에서 차별을 참고 견딘 한인들은 스스로를 보호하기 위해 정치적인 대표성을 획득할 필요가 있다. 폭동은 한인들에게 자명종으로 작용했다. 폭동 직후인 53일 로스앤젤레스에서 펼쳐진 평화 대행진에 약 3만 명의 한인들이 대거 참석했다. 이 평화 대행진의 이면에는 모든 사람들에게 존엄성과 기본적인 자유 그리고 존중을 허용하는 미국을 만드는 데 한인들이 기꺼이 참여하겠다는 분명한 메세지가 있었다. 폭동은 한인들이 오랫동안 지녀왔던 아메리칸 드림을 재고할 기회를 제공했다. 보다 중요한 것은 폭동 이후 1.5세 및 2세 한인들이 커뮤니티를 대변하는 데 중요한 역할을 맡기 시작했고 그동안 목소리를 낼 수 없었던 이민자들을 위해 이들 젊은 한인들이 목소리로 기여하기 시작했다는 사실이다.

참고문헌
1. Bluestone, Barry, and Harrison, Bennett (1982). The Deindustrialization of America: Plant Closings, Community Abandonment, and the Dismantling of Basic Industry. New York: Basic Books.
2. Chang, Edward T. (1999). “The Post-Los Angeles Riot Korean American Community: Challenges and Prospects.” Korean and Korean American Studies Bulletin, 10: 6-26.
3. Kang, Connie. “Korean Americans Still Plagued by Riots‟ Effects.” Los Angeles Times, April 30, 1994.
4. Kelly, Robin D. G. (2000). “Slangin‟ Rocks...Palestinian Style: Dispatches from the Occupied Zones of North America.” In Jill Nelson (Ed.), Police Brutality: An Anthology. New York: W. W. Norton & Company.
5. Kim, Elaine (1993). “Home is Where the Han is: A Korean American Perspective on the Los Angeles Upheavals.” Social Justice, 20: 1-21.
6. Kim, Nadia (2004). “A View from Below: An Analysis of Korean Americans‟ Racial Attitude.” Amerasia Journal, 30(1): 1-24.
7. Min, Pyong Gap (1996). Caught in the Middle: Korean Communities in New York and Los Angeles. Berkeley: University of California Press.
8. Navarro, Armando (1994). “The South Central Los Angeles Eruption: A Latino Perspective.” In Edward T. Chang and Russell C. Leong (Eds.), Los Angeles-Struggle toward Multiethnic Community: Asian American, African American, and Latino Perspectives. Seattle: University of Washington Press.
9. Ong, Paul, and Hee, Suzanne (1992). Losses in the Los Angeles Civil Unrest, April 29- May 1, 1992. UCLA Center for Pacific Rim Studies.
10. Ong, Paul, Park, Kyeyoung, and Tong, Yasmin (1994). “The Korean-Black Conflict and the State.” In Paul Ong, Edna Bonacich, and Lucie Cheng (Eds.), The New Asian Immigration in Los Angeles and Global Restructuring. Philadelphia: Temple University Press.
11. Park, Edward J. W. (1998). “Competing Visions: Political Formation of Korean Americans in Los Angeles, 1992-1997.” Amerasia Journal, 24(1): 41-57.
12. Park, Edward J. W. (1996). “Our L.A.? Korean Americans in Los Angeles after the Civil Unrest.” In Michael J. Dear, H. Eric Schockman, and Greg Hise (Eds.), Rethinking Los Angeles. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
13. Soja, Edward W. (1989). Postmodern Geographies: The Reassertion of Space in Critical Social Theory. London: Verso.
14. Sugrue, Thomas J. (1996). The Origins of the Urban Crisis: Race and Inequality in Postwar Detroit. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

From the moon that shines bright as a shooting star



No comments:

Post a Comment